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State DOT Straightens Jersey Barriers So They Don’t Completely Ruin Hudson River Greenway

State DOT contractors placed jersey barriers on the Hudson River Greenway in 2017 to prevent cars from mowing down cyclists — but only now the state is going to improve the unprotected intersections. Photo copyright Shmuli Evers, used with permission.

Several days after dropping long concrete barriers at dangerous angles across the Hudson River Greenway, New York State DOT is finally straightening them out to run parallel with the bike path.

Installed at 31 greenway access points on Thursday after last week's deadly truck ramming attack, the barriers were initially placed at angles that obstructed much of the greenway, creating pinch points and conditions ripe for head-on collisions on a path used by thousands of people each day.

On Friday, after the initial blowback from greenway users, state DOT told the Daily News' Dan Rivoli it would re-orient the barriers to allow for smoother travel. The agency made some changes over the weekend, but on Monday the barriers were still straddling the greenway at awkward angles.

Bulky jersey barriers remain strewn across the Hudson River Greenway at dangerous angles, three days after state DOT said they would be straightened out. Photo copyright Shmuli Evers, used with permission.
Bulky jersey barriers remain strewn across the Hudson River Greenway at dangerous angles, three days after state DOT said they would be straightened out. Photo copyright Shmuli Evers, used with permission.
Bulky jersey barriers remain strewn across the Hudson River Greenway at dangerous angles, three days after state DOT said they would be straightened out. Photo copyright Shmuli Evers, used with permission.

Streetsblog reached out to state DOT for an update Monday morning, but did not hear back until after 5 p.m.

"DOT is ensuring the placement of the barriers works for pedestrians and cyclists while still securing the path, and we will continue to partner with all stakeholders and the community to develop smart, permanent solutions for enhanced security," agency spokesperson Joseph Morrissey said.

Signs of progress started appearing Monday and Tuesday.

If we're going to use jersey barriers to keep cars off the greenway, this orientation is a big improvement and probably the best that can be done. But the agencies responsible for the greenway can't leave this in place for long. Especially during peak season, there are too many people biking, skating, jogging, and walking on the greenway to cram through these 20-foot-long cattle chutes.

The Hudson River Greenway is an important piece of transportation infrastructure -- the most-used bike path in the city -- and it needs more space. The state and city have said they're exploring a long-term solution. They need to do a better job of talking to people who use the greenway than they did during this process, and they need to make progress soon.

Much better. Photo: Shmuli Evers
Better, but not a long-term solution. Photo: Shmuli Evers
Much better. Photo: Shmuli Evers

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