Skip to Content
Streetsblog New York City home
Streetsblog New York City home
Log In
Carl Heastie

David Gantt Remains Transportation Chair, But It’s Carl Heastie’s Assembly

Like other committee chairs, David Gantt serves at the pleasure of the Assembly speaker.
Like other committee chairs, David Gantt will let legislation reach the Assembly floor if the speaker wants it to.
Assembly transportation chair David Gantt, now and forever.

Surprising no one, the leadership of Carl Heastie's Assembly looks just about identical to Sheldon Silver's. After publicly voting in Heastie to succeed Silver as speaker on Tuesday, Assembly Dems announced top posts and committee chair positions yesterday. There were few changes to speak of, and as expected Rochester rep David Gantt will remain chair of the Assembly transportation committee.

Over the years, lots of good legislation has died in Gantt's committee, including several bills to enable automated traffic enforcement in New York City. But most of those bills eventually made it through, often without a peep from Gantt. Why? Because while Gantt may have sincerely believed that red-light cameras violate driver privacy, Albany observers will tell you that his opinions, like those of other committee chairs, are incidental to the motivations of the Assembly's prime mover, who for the last 21 years was Sheldon Silver.

As Laura Seago, then with NYU's Brennan Center for Justice, told Streetsblog in 2009, "The speaker controls everything that comes to the floor." Bills moved through Gantt's committee when Silver wanted them to move. And so far, there is no indication that Heastie means to diminish the role of speaker.

We reported earlier this week that Heastie's voting record is fairly strong on street safety, though he hasn't shown much interest in improving transit for millions of New Yorkers. More notable may be Mayor de Blasio's reported backing of Heastie's speaker campaign, which could mean the speaker -- and by extension Gantt -- won't stand in the way of City Hall's street safety agenda in Albany.

Like last year, opposition to a more effective speed cam program or stronger statutes to prevent dangerous driving is probably going to be a greater obstacle in the GOP-controlled, de Blasio-hostile State Senate.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog New York City

SUV Driver Kills Girl, 3, in Harlem, Wounds Mom And Young Brothers

The girl's death marks another grim entry into a crisis of pedestrian traffic deaths this year.

July 12, 2024

Moped and E-Bike Safety Legislation Becomes State Law

Retailers must register mopeds at the point of sale, in addition to giving new owners safety information, under new legislation signed by Gov. Hochul on Thursday.

July 12, 2024

Roadway Dining May See Dramatic Decline Under Eric Adams As Deadline Looms

Fewer than two dozen restaurants are in the pipeline for roadside seating, according to public records.

July 12, 2024

Opinion: Congestion Pricing Is A Compromise

Alternatives paths to cut congestion and pollution and fund the MTA make congestion tolls look like a cheap parlor trick.

July 12, 2024

Friday’s Headlines: Department of Victim Blaming Edition

Traffic deaths in the city are on pace to reach their highest number since at least 2013 — and DOT is reportedly blaming "jaywalking." Plus more news.

July 12, 2024
See all posts