Today’s Headlines

  • More Coverage of Escalating Subway Ridership (WSJ, NYT, WNYC, News)
  • Charges Dismissed Against Keith Wright Staffer for Interfering in DUI Arrest (Post)
  • De Blasio’s PlaNYC Update Due Tomorrow, But Will It Be Called PlaNYC? (Capital)
  • Construction Begins to Replace Crumbling Stone at Marty Markowitz’s Old Plaza Parking Spot (Eagle)
  • NJ Transit Riders Get Fare Hikes, Service Cuts as Gas Tax Remains Nation’s 2nd-Lowest (MTR, WCBS)
  • MTA to Examine Subway Ridership Impacts of Kingsbridge Armory Redevelopment (Bx Times)
  • Bus Driver Caught Reading While Driving Suspended Without Pay (Post)
  • De Blasio Seeks State Law Requiring Seatbelts for Front-Seat Passengers, Minors in Taxis (News)
  • After Years of Lawsuits From Taxi Industry, News Says It’s Time to Give Up on the Taxi of Tomorrow

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • BBnet3000

    I’d like the Taxi of Tomorrow (can we start calling it the NV200 now that its the Taxi of Today?) to stick around if only for the reduced dooring risk. It’s a lot smaller than the big chunky minivans that also have sliding doors.

  • The Daily News’ editorial page seems to be taking a “give up” tack lately. Give up on the Taxi of Tomorrow. Give up on Vision Zero. Over what other reasonably decent ideas can they collective wave the white flag?

  • Larry Littlefield

    I’ve given up on decent public schools. The unions won — irrevocably. A huge increase in funding went to a series of unfunded pension increases.
    We need to admit defeat and focus on giving people alternatives. We can’t just keep draining other services to pay more, and having it go to more pension increases.
    What the pension increases did to the schools the debt has done to the MTA. Thus, I generally get around by bike now.
    Bow before Generation Greed.

  • BBnet3000

    Yesterday morning at the Manhattan Bridge landing: Spring training for the NYPD’s summer Vision Zero initiatives?

  • Transplant

    Josh Greenman, Harry Seigel, and the editorial board of The Daily News represents tough, “real” New Yorkers. And we all know that the defining characteristic of tough New Yorkers is their habit of just giving up at the first sign of difficulty.

  • HamTech87

    When faced with crowded, broken, and broke transit, MTA’s boss Cuomo channels Marie Antoinette and says, ‘Let them buy cars.’ ;-(

  • red_greenlight1

    I work in education and DOE teachers don’t get placards. Perhaps you’d be better suited to commenting on the post’s website?

  • HamTech87

    With the high ridership, I wish the MTA would revisit all the closed subway entrances.

  • BBnet3000

    The number of cars with DOE placards on the dash parked next to most schools cannot be just administrators. If they are our school system’s problem might be extreme top-heaviness.

  • red_greenlight1

    They are probably admins outside of the school level. I know for a fact rank and file teachers don’t get placards. These are facts.

  • Bobberooni

    I could see the demise of the Taxi of Tomorrow, with the rise of ride-hailing apps. NYC needs to drop it, and instead focus on standards that apply to ALL taxi and limousine services INCLUDING Uber — for example, accessibility requirements, safety features, driver vetting and licensing, auto inspections, etc — as well as a shared database listing those who should not be driving for hire. Unlike pollution control, this is exactly the kind of thing that
    probably works better if government sets regulations and then gets out
    of the way.

  • Bobberooni

    In “defense” of NJ (if one might use such a word), they are not exactly spending huge sums on roads either. Their gas tax is low, and they are underinvested in transportation infrastructure of all kinds. The predictable result is crumbling roads, an outdated rail system and massive overcrowding at PABT.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Who gets to park in all those reserved spots then? The ones you can’t park in during school hours.

  • red_greenlight1

    You mean the lots that the DOE owns?

    Wait I thought you are complaining about the DOE giving placards to teachers -which they don’t- to park in public spaces. But you’re actually complain they allow their employees to park in private lots not accessible to the general public and set aside for employee parking? Really?

    Which school has three lots? Must only have one or two?

  • The issue that ought to be on everybody’s mind when they read “Bus Driver Caught Reading While Driving Suspended Without Pay (Post)” is that the union that represents this driver, Amalgamated Transit Union 1056, is not only defending his driving and reading, but along with other transit worker unions is lobbying the NYC Council for a law to exempt MTA bus drivers from being arrested for running over pedestrians who have the right of way in crosswalks, and lobbying legislators in Albany for special treatment for their members as well.
    http://assembly.state.ny.us/leg/?term=2015&bn=A06048

  • Larry Littlefield

    Not lots. On-street spaces.
    Three schools near me. All have no parking near them, except those authorized.

  • Ian Turner

    It actually doesn’t necessarily make sense for taxis and uber to have the same accessibility standards. With a hailed service like a taxi, it makes sense for 100% (or nearly 100%) of the fleet to be accessible. But with a request-based service like Uber, it only matters if there is one free accessible vehicle within driving distance.

  • Ian Turner
  • red_greenlight1

    I’ve yet to see or hear about a teacher getting one. Your article is likely dated.

  • red_greenlight1

    What school? Pictures please.

  • qrt145

    Here’s a sign outside a school in my neighborhood: no parking on school days except faculty vehicles.

  • ohnonononono

    Yes, I think that’s standard signage around most schools in the city.

    I don’t think there’s a consistent policy about which teachers get placards, but many certainly do. I think each school receives a number of placards (based on what? unclear) to distribute.

  • Joe R.

    I personally don’t like the idea of teachers having private lots, either, even if they don’t have parking placards. In many cases those lots are former areas which used to be for student recreation. NYC basically said teacher parking is more important than students getting exercise. Teachers should set an example for their students. One of the best ways to do this is to not drive to work in a city where driving private automobiles has enormous externalities.

  • ohnonononono

    Here’s a “caucus” of the UFT complaining in June that ” the City forced a new agreement with the UFT anyway, changing the system from first come first served, to a system where many fewer had permits” — i.e. the number of teachers with parking permits is not zero. http://newaction.org/2014/06/08/time-to-fix-school-parking/

  • ohnonononono

    DOT gives out the placards, not DOE.

  • Joe R.

    They’re just taking the same stance many of our childish elected representatives are. When a problem is too difficult to solve in the span of a 30 minute sitcom a fair number of people will just bury their heads like ostriches and pretend it doesn’t exist. Our so-called leaders shouldn’t. In fact, many of them and their predecessors created these now seemingly intractable problems merely for short-term gain. That’s all the more reason they should now devote all their energies to fixing them. Or at least this is what adults do. Sadly, in general we don’t have adults in charge any more. We have children in adult’s bodies. The last generation where the vast majority of elected leaders acting like adults is now in their 90s and older, if they’re even still alive. The beginning of the end was the so-called baby boom generation getting in power. As much as I hate to admit it, I think things will get even worse as my generation starts running things. There is a severe dearth in leadership in this city and this nation. The elected elite may talk a good line and look all respectable but when they look in a mirror something is usually missing. In many cases that something is a spine.

  • Bobberooni

    Thanks, that’s a good point. Unfortunately, the Taxi of Tomorrow project missed a big opportunity to make all cabs accessible, choosing instead an option that would result in very few yellow cabs being accessible.

    With the advent of ride-hailing apps, one wonders whether accessibility of yellow cabs should even be a goal. Instead, why not regulate ride hailing apps, requiring that they are able to respond to accessible requests with some decent level of service (wait time, etc). The medallion cabs can have their own app.

    I think we will discover that ride hailing apps are just a better way to hail cabs, especially if you are mobility-impaired. Especially if you don’t enjoy sitting out on Lexington Ave, in a wheelchair, in the rain, in the middle of an intersection, hoping that the next cab going by will stop for you.

  • red_greenlight1

    Exactly DOT=/= DOE.

  • red_greenlight1

    Um as far as I know those have always been parking lots. Is that the best use? Probably not but it’s tough taking mass transist to work at 5:30 am when you work in an area not subway accessible. Citation for your claim that DOE took reck spaces form kids.

  • red_greenlight1

    So that’s a valid NYC sign. What’s the problem?

  • red_greenlight1

    Many don’t in fact most don’t. Citation to most getting them. Don’t try and find one you won’t because they don’t.

  • qrt145

    The problem is that you keep denying the indisputable fact that (some) teachers do receive the privilege of reserved parking on the streets.

  • red_greenlight1

    I’ve adjusted my potion from none to very few. The problem here is that many seem to think that ALL teachers or MOST get parking decals. This is of course false.

  • Joe R.

    I’ve read complaints about it from parents. Also, most schools open at 9 to the students. The teachers may need to be in 15 or 30 minutes before that but I have yet to hear of any teacher having to come in at 5:30 AM. That’s a totally unrealistic starting time in a city where many depend upon public transit. Most businesses in the city already realize this and won’t ask their employees to come it at some ungodly hour like 5 or 6 AM.

    My stance here is if your employer asks you to come in at an hour when public transit is sparse, or if they decide to locate themselves in an area with no public transit, then it’s their responsibility to provide transportation to any employees who need it. I have no problems with the city running shuttle buses to pick up teachers who really need to be in at 5:30 AM in schools not near subways. I have no problems with the school reserving spaces or having a parking lot for those buses, either. I do have a big problem with schools either directly or indirectly subsidizing people using a private automobile to drive to work. That adds to the already high levels of congestion around schools. I personally feel the areas around schools should be strict no parking zones, other than for official school vehicles like school buses. That includes a several block radius around the school. The reason? To discourage parents who drive their kids to school and make traffic problems around local schools even worse. These kids could walk or take public transit just like I did and just about all of my peers did.

    It’s funny how back when I went to public schools in the 1960s and 1970s the vast majority of teachers didn’t drive to work. A fair number didn’t even own cars. If anything, public transit is better now then it was back then. At least trains aren’t being taken out of service constantly for mechanical breakdowns.

  • ahwr

    Citation for your claim that DOE took reck spaces form kids.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1997/12/03/nyregion/class-notes.html

    It’s been done before. In some cases the board of education gave permission, in others the teachers and school administrators acted on their own. It was a real problem in some areas. Are you saying it’s not anymore, and that all reck spaces that had been taken for parking have been returned to students, or sold off to developers etc…? If that’s the case, then great!

  • ahwr

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/27/nyregion/27placards.html

    A letter to Ms. Weingarten from Mr. Skyler, dated Tuesday, says the city will maintain the 10,007 on-street spaces. The letter also says the city will not reduce the 15,060 spaces in parking lots that teachers have access to with a different type of permit.

    That’s a lot of parking spaces. Any idea how those spots are distributed? It’s a big city. Are you sure there aren’t some neighborhoods where most teachers get parking decals and essentially reserved parking?

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/education/school-workers-give-new-city-permit-overhaul-failing-grade-article-1.304320

    Bronx Global was given more permits than staff.

    If you walk by a school like that everyday then in your section of the city all teachers, or most teachers do get parking placards.

    Teachersand other school officials are slated to receive 11,150 permits – an82% reduction from last year.

    Even after a massive reduction that’s a lot of spaces. And before the reduction, it looks like a lot of teachers were getting those placards. Not all of course, but a lot.

  • Ian Turner

    Mostly agreed, but keep in mind only half of New Yorkers have a smart phone, and the elderly are even less likely to have one. Having a smart phone can’t be a prerequisite of mobility in the city.

  • Bobberooni

    ALL New Yorkers who need a wheelchair lift own a wheelchair. The assistive devices industry is a racket, charging health insurance companies exorbitant amounts for stuff that’s not so different from “regular” consumer products at a fraction the price. Getting a smartphone for every NYC wheelchair user (who does not already have one) would not be such a big deal, and would be FAR CHEAPER than retrofitting a majority of cabs for accessibility.

    The challenge here is getting the rules changed to allow insurance companies to pay for smartphones. Last time I checked, they would only pay for “specialty” assistive devices at many times the price. In recent years, smartphones have begun to do much of the work formerly done by these specialty devices, but the system has not yet caught up to that reality. [Based on experiences of one of my friends, how is blind. Her iPhone is now her most important assistive device, and insurance would have nothing to do with it. But they’d have no problem dropping $5K on a braille reader.]

  • qrt145

    I see a business opportunity:

    1) put a sticker on an iPhone that calls it an “iAssistDevice”
    2) put another sticker on it that says “$5000”
    3) …
    4) PROFIT!

  • red_greenlight1

    Wow you really have no idea how education works. 15-30 minutes? Really?! Try more like 1-3 depending.

  • Joe R.

    One hour sounds reasonable but that would still put most teachers arriving at maybe 8 AM, perhaps 7 AM at the few schools where classes might start at 8. I used to go to work and school pretty early. I waited at a bus stop which is right across the street from PS200 at times between 6:30 and 7:30. I generally didn’t see anybody parked or arriving at the school until 7. Even then, those early arrivals were mostly maintenance type vehicles for janitorial staff. The teachers started to arrive at 7:30. I wasn’t around to see what happened later, but I do know it didn’t look like many people were in the school at 7:30. I don’t doubt there are isolated cases where a teacher may need to arrive at 5:30 AM but this is certainly the exception, not the rule. It’s really difficult to get employees to come in at 5:30 AM in any job, nevermind one where the majority are educated professionals.