Skip to Content
Streetsblog New York City home
Streetsblog New York City home
Log In
Federal Transportation Bill

Mica’s Measurements: $230 Billion, Six Years

11:06 AM EDT on July 7, 2011

Early reports have spilled some of the beans on Rep. John Mica’s proposal for the next transportation reauthorization, which he’s rolling out for reporters in an hour. (Note that he’s still not formally introducing the bill and we’ll have no draft legislative text to pore over. With luck, he’ll at least give a timeline today for when that’s coming.)

Here’s what we’re hearing:

    • It’s a six-year bill, putting it immediately into conflict with the Senate’s two-year proposal.
    • It will allocate $35 billion a year, although that would make it a $210 billion bill over six years and most of the reports we’re seeing say $230 billion. Unclear where that extra $20 billion comes from, or if it’s an error.
    • The way we calculate this, it’s almost a 40 percent cut from existing levels. (SAFETEA-LU allocated $286 billion over five years, equaling $57.2 billion per year.) The Ryan budget had called for a 30 percent cut.
    • Rather than establish a national infrastructure bank, as called for by the president and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle (though mostly Democrats), Mica’s bill would bolster state infrastructure banks. Thirty-two states already have infrastructure banks.
    • Mica says he won’t raise TIFIA over and above Highway Trust Fund levels, as the Senate bill does.
    • Mica says he thinks private investment will fill in some of the gaps in what the government can fund.
    • Mica appears to feel hamstrung by the extreme fiscal conservatism that’s overtaken the House since the new class was sworn in in January. "Have you seen the votes on the floor," he told reporters yesterday. "They would vote down a Mother's Day resolution if it had extra spending. That is the climate we're in."

We’ll bring you more details following Mica’s briefing, as well as a press conference by Democrats with their response.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog New York City

Congestion Pricing Opponents Are Blocking Disabled Access to Mass Transit, Politicians Charge

Just as the MTA begins speeding up new elevator construction, congestion pricing opponents are poised to stop it.

February 23, 2024

Legislation Introduced in Georgia to Fight Temporary License Plate Fraud

The bill is the most significant effort yet to stop the flow of fraudulent paper tags from Georgia car dealerships to New York City streets.

February 23, 2024

Community Board Backs DOT Road Diet for Brooklyn’s Deadly Third Av.

“This is just a beginning of what we could do to fix our community,” said one board member. “This is not done, this is not where we finish off.”

February 23, 2024

Friday’s Headlines: More Lunch Consumption Edition

Streetfilms goes to Paris. Plus more news.

February 23, 2024

Advocates Slam Albany Pols for Using Transit Fund to Encourage Driving

Gov. Hochul and state legislators in Albany are spending a congestion pricing-adjacent fund on toll rebates for drivers and showing zero interest in bus or rail, transit advocates charged.

February 23, 2024
See all posts