NY1’s “Inside City Hall” on Congestion Pricing

Inside City Hall, a daily political show on NY1, filed this report last night on congestion pricing, traffic enforcement, and PlaNYC. Their report highlights the flawed Quinnipiac poll and the mayor responded, "City government is supposed to lead, state government is supposed to
lead, federal government is supposed to lead, not do polls and and do
just the popular things. They are supposed to do what’s right."

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