This Week: Three Big Protected Bike Lane Projects

DOT’s plans for protected bike lane plans on Chrystie Street, Jay Street, and Queens Boulevard have major significance for the city’s bike network. This week there are public meetings related to all three of these projects.

Check the Streetsblog calendar for a full list of events. Here are the highlights:

  • Tuesday: The two-way protected bike lane planned for Chrystie Street will run along the western edge of Sara D. Roosevelt Park. Manhattan Community Board 3 requested that DOT organize a public meeting with the Sara D. Roosevelt Park Coalition to ensure seniors and the visually-impaired are included in the planning process. 2 p.m.
  • Also Tuesday: Queens Community Board 4 is scheduled to vote on DOT’s plan to extend the Queens Boulevard protected bike lanes in May, but Tuesday’s meeting will be the last time to comment on the project before that vote. That’s because at meetings where votes are held, the CB 4 always votes before opening the floor to public comment. 7:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday: The full board of Brooklyn Community Board 2 is expected to vote on DOT’s plan for protected bike lanes on Jay Street in Downtown Brooklyn, which the transportation committee endorsed last month. DOT may show design details for the areas by the Manhattan Bridge and south of Fulton Street that were not finished at the time of last month’s meeting. 6 p.m.

Be sure to check the calendar for updates and, as always, drop us a line if you know about an event that we missed.

  • Wow

    Can’t wait to see people trying to ride through these bus stops and across driveways where the green paint completely disappears. Quality of design really does mean nothing here.

    Steely sold us down the river on this one after TA came up with a wider, less conflict-ridden, center running idea. Why did they push for a decent design on Sands but not on this more heavily used route?

  • r

    Negotiating the bus stops, while not ideal, will be fine for most riders as bus service isn’t so frequent as to make it a huge issue. I think the bigger problem is the striped space above each part of the bike lane. That’s designed to allow cyclists to see the space around the bus and pull out. But we all know that with placard abuse it will be blocked by parked cars. DOT needs to build this out in concrete so drivers are less likely to leave their cars there.

  • BBnet3000

    They’re frequent enough that you see two at once regularly. The problem you cited would also be a lot less likely with the center running lane TA proposed.

    “Negotiating” is a poor word for what is going to happen. The buses will block the bike lane for as long as they take to load, and when they are trying to pull out they will be blocked by people pulling around the outside. A conflict engineered by design.

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