How to Ease Pain at the Pump Without Deepening Oil Dependence

As the drumbeat for domestic drilling grows louder, can the Democratic leadership come up with a better alternative than tapping the Strategic Petroleum Reserve? Over at the Huffington Post, Shelley Poticha and Geoff Anderson of Transportation for America propose a few ideas that will actually pay dividends. Pols who are serious about reducing the impact of high gas prices should listen up:

We have to
keep pace with demands for public transportation, and give this country
a reason to be proud of its high-speed trains, light-rail lines, and
both rapid and conventional bus transportation options.

We need to make more of our streets safe and convenient for walking
and biking to work, school, shops and public transportation stops. We
have to create incentives for developers to invest in our close-in
suburbs and urban centers, to meet the huge demand for affordable homes
in convenient locations. Americans are not dumb: given the real choice,
we would much rather invest in well-located real estate than in
gasoline.

We are tired of feeling like victims — whether of oil companies, poor
planning, or a lack of vision. Americans are ready for innovative
change, if only our leaders will follow the people’s charge.

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