Skip to Content
Streetsblog New York City home
Streetsblog New York City home
Log In
commute_hi.jpg

According to a new U.S. Census Bureau analysis of data from the American Community Survey, most Americans drive to work -- alone, and public transportation commuters are concentrated in a handful of large cities. From the Bureau's press release:

Despite rising fuel costs, commuters continued to drive their cars in 2005. The survey, gathered over the course of the year, found that driving to work was the favored means of commute of nearly nine out of 10 workers (87.7 percent), with most people (77 percent) driving alone.

In contrast, 4.7 percent of commuters used public transportation to travel to work in 2005, an increase of about 0.1 percent over 2000 levels. About half of the nation's public transportation commuters can be found in 10 of the nation's 50 cities with the most workers age 16 or over.

"With each succeeding year, we'll be able to see how people respond to changing circumstances, such as rising gas prices," said Census Bureau Director Louis Kincannon.

The survey found that Portland, Oregon has the highest rate of bicycle commuting at 3.5 percent. New York is number 28 on the list with a 0.5 percent bike commuting rate but ranks number one in total number of cyclists with nearly twice as many bike commuters as Portland.

Among large cities, Boston has the highest rate of workers who walk to work at 12.5 percent. New York, which is often thought of as the country's best walking city, was 4th on the list at 9.4 percent behind Washington D.C. and San Francisco.

You can download the entire report here (Excel).

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog New York City

Thursday’s Headlines: ‘We’ll See You in Court, Gov.’ Edition

Today's the day that City Comptroller Brad Lander and his team of legal eagles will start the fight to save congestion pricing!

July 25, 2024

Hochul Must Put Up or Shut Up on Congestion Pricing, New Senate Transportation Chair Says

Gov. Hochul must produce a "100-day plan" to replace the $16.5 billion MTA funding shortfall created by her decision to cancel congestion pricing.

July 24, 2024

DOT Begins Safety Upgrades for Atlantic Av. But Locals Want More

Some changes are coming for Atlantic, but they're not enough, say street safety advocates.

July 24, 2024

MTA Contractor Scrambles to Refund Fake Charges After OMNY ‘Upgrade’ Goes Awry

Cubic is working to issue refunds to riders improperly charged thanks to the glitch, a spokesman said.

July 24, 2024

Podcast: GOP’s ‘Project 2025’ is ‘Based on a Lot of Ignorance’

What does Transportation for America's Beth Osborne think of the transportation portion of the Heritage Foundation's playbook for a Trump presidency?

July 24, 2024
See all posts