Seattle Master Plan Aims to Keep Cyclists Safe

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Looking toward a future in which more and more people will travel by bike, the city of Seattle is launching several efforts to improve cycling conditions and increase motorist awareness of cyclists’ rights. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports:

Making bicyclists of all ages feel more secure in city traffic is a top goal of the city of Seattle, which will soon release the final draft of its Bicycle Master Plan for public comment.

At the heart of the 10-year strategy is a call to designate more than 200 miles of roadway as bike lanes, along with guidelines for safely sharing roads and trails with cars and pedestrians. While the city currently offers only 25 miles of designated bike lanes, the plan anticipates a huge increase in recreational and commuting bicyclists.

What excites Wayne Wentz, the city’s director of traffic management, is that the plan was mandated by the people — as part of a $360 million property tax levy passed last fall — which means it comes with the funding to make it happen.

Photo is from Seattle’s Ride of Silence on May 17, 2006 to commemorate fallen cyclists: JohnCalnan/Flickr

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