Tuesday’s Headlines: The New York Post Is Wrong AGAIN Edition

The driver of this van admitted that he opened his door into cyclist Em Samolewicz, who was then hit by a truck. The van driver was finally issued a summons. Photo: Dave Colon
The driver of this van admitted that he opened his door into cyclist Em Samolewicz, who was then hit by a truck. The van driver was finally issued a summons. Photo: Dave Colon

One day after we criticized the New York Post for its anti-cycling editorial, the Tabloid of Record decided to treat the occasion of the city’s 18th cyclist death this year with an article seeking to create sympathy for the driver who doored artist Em Samolewicz, sending her to the pavement of Third Avenue, where she was run over by the driver of a huge truck.

Other outlets, such as amNY, covered Samolewicz’s death in a more satisfactory manner — and even the Post finally got around to mourning the victim. Gothamist’s Jake Offenhartz had the best scoop, getting an NYPD spokesperson to reveal that the NYPD does not understand New York State vehicular code.

Meanwhile, here’s the rest of the news from an otherwise slow yesterday:

  • State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli has issued a damning report about why the MTA’s new high-tech signaling system was so delayed (NYDN, amNY). The Post’s David Meyer focused on one example of just how bad that agency can get. Jose Martinez at The City also had a waste scoop.
  • The Post had two examples of Jersey car carnage.
  • City Island gets a traffic light! (Bronx Times)
  • A drunk and unlicensed driver killed a motorcyclist on the Long Island Expressway late on Monday night. (WPIX, initially missing the drunk element that was later provided by NYPD)
  • Localize.city crunched the numbers on the most dangerous intersections in the city. (Curbed, NY Post)
  • And there was some sad personal news for our own Dave Colon. (Gothamist)
  • Larry Littlefield

    DiNapoli: the unions who form the basis of our political support and the contractors who contribute to our campaigns are screwing the people who don’t matter — and the future, which doesn’t matter.

    I assume the job he is referring to is Flushing CBTC. That was only one of three projects to replace the signals on the Flushing Line, with the first two having been completed earlier.

    The biggest news by far in the article is the contract was awarded to Thales, and that may explain the delay. The first CBTC pilot, on the Canarsie Line, was awarded to Siemens. Siemens also did the Automatic Train Supervision System and the was doing the countdown clocks.

    New York City Transit desperately wanted to avoid being dependent on one vendor, so it has an “interoperability” project for other vendors to join the CBTC program. None did. NYCT was stuck with Siemens. Cost and timelines soared to the point where it would be impossible for New Yorkers to afford to pay to put in a new signal system before the old one collapses.

    So perhaps the delay and added cost was due to a desperate need to bring in at least one more vendor. If so, it might have been worth it, or at least necessary.

  • JL

    So sad that for many young adult cyclists navigating these mean streets, their first mistake could be their last. Condolences to her loved ones.

    The Post photo shows the van (doorer) is in the middle of the street. The photo here shows it’s close to 2ft from the curb. If the doorer who killed her doesn’t want to “feel sad” again, ask him to park next to the curb next time. Like the vehicle in front of his.

  • Andrew

    New York City Transit desperately wanted to avoid being dependent on one vendor, so it has an “interoperability” project for other vendors to join the CBTC program. None did. NYCT was stuck with Siemens.

    Stale information. Queens Boulevard CBTC is a joint Siemens/Thales project, based on an interoperable standard. The interoperable standard didn’t exist when Flushing CBTC was awarded, which isn’t a major problem because the 7 doesn’t share tracks with any other lines. Queens Boulevard needs to be interoperable to avoid locking the entire B Division (except the L) to one vendor.

  • vnm

    How is the Post the Tabloid of Record? I’d never heard that until I saw a reference the other day on Streetsblog.

  • kevd

    I’m assuming Gersh made that up because he used to work there.

  • Wilfried84

    And I read the moniker as a tad ironic.

  • Larry Littlefield

    I hope the nearly two decade delay will be worth it. After Queens Boulevard, the last pilot project, CBTC was supposed to be cheap and fast. Less wayside equipment, standardized programming.

    We’ll see. All I know is, they plan on spending all the future congestion pricing money in five years by bonding against it, and then Foyle and Cuomo and DeBlasio and their generations slink away laughing the whole way. The federal government will also be broke, thanks to Trump.

    So there better be no need for capital investment for at least a decade or possibly two after that.

  • AMH

    Big news from the Onion:

    Police Apprehend Man For Repeatedly Failing To Pay For Subway https://t.co/YE4fVKmFdk pic.twitter.com/syYdjwqiVU— The Onion (@TheOnion) July 29, 2019

    https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

  • Larry Littlefield

    They’d have to arrest the entire apparatus on RICO grounds for that: every NY pol since the early 1990s.

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