Friday’s Headlines: Cars Are Big Killing Machines Edition

Police arrested city firefighter Brauley De La Rosa on Monday after he tried to kill a cyclist with his car days earlier. Photo: Liz Gonzales
Police arrested city firefighter Brauley De La Rosa on Monday after he tried to kill a cyclist with his car days earlier. Photo: Liz Gonzales

You had to see the video — and thanks to Gothamist, many did. A driver on the West Side Highway was seen trying to drive over a cyclist. Streetsblog’s own coverage pointed out that, sure, we don’t know exactly what happened — but we do know that there’s not a single thing that someone on a bike can do to a driver that would warrant being run over as retaliation. Thankfully, the NYPD was on the case … and let the driver go.

Oy vey.

Here’s the rest of your news for Friday:

  • Wow, Jeffrey Mays really missed one key thing about Corey Johnson in his broad profile on him in the Times. Not a word about the would-be mayor’s leadership on livable streets? It’s like the guy’s main platform agenda! His “State of the City” address centered on his one-hundred-page plan for fixing our streets. Not a single word, Gray Lady? Come on.
  • Breaking news out of Brooklyn’s Community Board 10 in Bay Ridge: The DOT’s plan for a “starter pack” of bike lanes didn’t fair too well, says Radio Free Bay Ridge. Remind us again why the DOT asks untrained people to make decisions about street safety.
  • In case you missed it, we did a post-mortem on Polly Trottenberg’s resignation from the MTA board.
  • Um, cutting a cord on a timekeeping device is not a good way for LIRR workers to fight the perception that they lie about their hours (NYDN). And they’re still using antique punch cards, like in “Laverne and Shirley”! (NY Post)
  • Amazon wants its delivery robots to be treated like pedestrians. So you mean like garbage? (Business Insider)
  • Gothamist has another disgusting-thing-on-the-subway video — which you know you’re going to watch.
  • And how about this: A cop on a bike ticketing trucks parked in a bike lane! (Reddit)

That’s all for now, folks. We’ll start our day at Sen. Jessica Ramos’s e-bike hearing at Flushing Town Hall at 10 a.m.

  • Larry Littlefield

    “Cuomo puts MTA workers on notice after time clock cord cut in LIRR office.”

    MTA workers? Yup TWU, you are on notice. When the recession and fiscal crisis hits, this is why NYC Transit is the first to be cut.

    This is what I complained about. Somebody needs to deal with the fact that Long Island’s political culture has issues that are draining them, us.

    Why isn’t East Side Access finished?

  • (Note: “didn’t fare [not ‘fair’] too well”.)

    We need more cops on bikes. They should be regularly riding up and down the bike lanes on Manhattan avenues and in other key lanes such as Queens Boulevard and the Grand Concourse, ordering drivers to move their vehicles and ticketing everything that’s parked in the lanes.

  • Reggie

    “Remind us again why the DOT asks untrained people to make decisions about street safety.” Okay, since you asked. Because sometimes people with a local perspective provide input that transportation planners didn’t see when they develop their plans. (Examples? Ian Dutton, Jay Street between Prospect and York) Of course, in soliciting that input, DOT invites less constructive feedback. That’s part of the price you pay for the potential benefits. The question in my opinion isn’t why “DOT asks untrained people to make decisions about street safety” but rather why community boards aren’t populated with more knowledgeable members, and I don’t limit that observation to the members of transportation committees.

  • (Note: “didn’t fare [not ‘fair’] too well”.)

    We need more cops on bikes. They should regularly be riding up and down the Manhattan avenues and other key bike lanes such as Queens Boulevard and the Grand Concourse, ordering drivers to move their vehicles, and giving tickets to everything that blocks the bike lanes.

  • We do not have to accept that just because DOT goes to boards for input it invites less constructive feedback. DOT has a choice about how it presents information, what it comes to boards to ask for, and how it accepts or chooses not to accept different types of feedback.

    DOT can and should go to community boards, but not for up or down votes on whether or not traffic calming and things like bike lanes should happen. They should use local knowledge for things that can only be known locally. For example, in discussing the new Fourth Avenue bike lane some of us told DOT reps that there’s a guy who sells fruit out of a van who likes to park along the curb near 3rd Street. We asked that space be given to him in a big buffer so that he doesn’t have to block the bike lane or lose his space. DOT included a nice space at that corner and he’ll be able to keep his business going without disrupting the flow of the bike lane. That’s a far cry from using fake concerns over traffic or the health of small businesses to preserve the status quo.

    Plus, where a bike lane doesn’t take parking of change the fundamental geometry of the street, as was the case in Bay Ridge, DOT simply shouldn’t seek supportive resolutions or base installations on whether or not it gets them. It’s a true fault of current leadership that this process hasn’t changed in six years.

  • Reggie

    Doug, I don’t disagree with a thing you wrote and was trying to convey a similar message. If “invites” is the wrong word, how about “leaves the door open for”?

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