NYC Is Littered With Dangerous Parking Lots Like the One Where Luz Gonzalez Was Killed

Narrow parking zones next to the sidewalk put pedestrians at risk, and they're everywhere. Some are even required by zoning.

The illegal parking lot at Clean City Laundy where a driver backed out and killed Luz Gonzalez last month. Image via Google Maps
The illegal parking lot at Clean City Laundy where a driver backed out and killed Luz Gonzalez last month. Image via Google Maps

Last month, a hit-and-run driver leaving a Bushwick laundromat backed over and killed 4-year-old Luz Gonzalez on the sidewalk. The parking lot — a narrow strip directly abutting the sidewalk — was illegal, and the Department of Buildings shut it down.

Clean City Laundry was ordered to paint over the parking stall markings and barricade the space to prevent vehicles from entering, according to a DOB spokesperson.

But there are parking lots like it, where drivers have to back over the sidewalk to get into or out of a space, all over the city. Many of them are perfectly legal. In fact, the parking is often required by city code.

Take 491 Knickerbocker Avenue, just a few blocks away from the Clean City site in Bushwick:

The parking lot at 491 Knickerbocker Avenue is required by the city's zoning rules, but drivers can only get there by crossing over the sidewalk -- the exact same condition that killed 4-year-old Luz Gonzalez in June. Photo: Google Maps
The parking lot at 491 Knickerbocker Avenue is required by the city’s zoning rules, but it creates a condition where drivers have to execute turns and reverse over sidewalk space, either on their way in or on their way out. Photo: Google Maps

The strip mall houses a U.S. Army recruiting center, a MetroPCS store, and a laundromat. While parking is legal on this parcel, the number of spaces violates the certificate of occupancy, which allows for 19 spots. On Google Maps, 28 painted spots are visible, plus a few vehicles occupying space ad hoc. According to the Department of Buildings database, the agency has issued no fines to the property owners for exceeding the number of legal parking spots. DOB said it “has not received any recent complaints” about this parking lot or others we brought to its attention.

This surface parking lot outside the Chase Bank at 391 Eastern Parkway has no curb cut along the building’s street frontage, but is required by the city’s commercial zoning rules, according to DOB.

This is completely legal. Photo: <a href="
This is completely legal. Photo: Google Maps

As with the Clean City parking lot, accessing these spaces essentially requires driving in reverse over a sidewalk at some point, in addition to jumping the curb.

Another parking lot only accessible by jumping the curb is at 361 Third Avenue in Gowanus. The same building has a second narrow parking zone around the corner on Third Avenue. Dangerous as they may be, these spots are also mandated by zoning, DOB says.

Image via Google Maps
Image via Google Maps

Conditions like the one that created a fatal risk for Luz Gonzalez are also pervasive at car dealerships, which store their merchandise on sidewalks. Though the practice is against the law, the rules are rarely enforced.

Despite the dangers these parking zones create all across the city, there is no initiative from the DOB to systematically identify and remedy them. As long as that’s the case, it’s only a matter of time before someone else loses their life.

  • Joe R.

    My contribution to the list:

    https://www.google.com/maps/@40.7273974,-73.8130367,3a,75y,34.88h,82.31t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s3x1PUPZR_EbfKNglhwV0Bw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

    I don’t see how these could be remotely legal. If businesses want parking in front of their premises, then that means a curb cut in front also, and NO curbside parking. You can’t have your cake and eat it also with both types of parking in the same location.

    By the way, the “remedy” DOT should use is to put bollards anywhere sidewalk parking is pervasive. That especially means around police stations and car dealerships. Since the NYPD won’t enforce the laws here, physically preventing illegal parking seems to be the only answer.

  • Tooscrapps

    Aside from making it easier for cars to drive up onto them, why are a lot of NYC curbs so pathetically low?

  • DoctorMemory

    As long as we’re at this, let’s talk gas stations. They’re rare in Manhattan, but when you find them, de facto 100% of the adjacent sidewalk space is used as street access, and there is zero enforcement of double-yellow lines around them so people regularly make insane blind turns into and out of the station, cutting off pedestrians and oncoming traffic. I’ve lost track of the number of times that I’ve been nearly plastered by drivers around the the Citgo at 204 & Broadway and it’s neither particularly better nor worse than any other gas station in the city.

  • AnoNYC
  • meelar2

    Imagine if we had a mayor who actually cared about Vision Zero. Such a person would have plenty of legal tools to go after these, decreasing the amount of driving in the city and saving lives. Alas…

  • MtotheI
  • ItsEasyBeingGreen

    Doesn’t zoning only apply to new buildings? Lots of older buildings are non-compliant with the parking regulations. I suspect a lot of the pre-1961 buildings are in fact doing this by choice.

    I also don’t see how this is a legal way to provide the required parking for new builds if there isn’t even a legal curb cut.

  • com63

    Many years or repaving without fully grinding away the existing pavement? They are supposed to be 7″ tall when new.

  • Some commercial property owners in Dallas have reduced their on-street parking to build more outdoor café/pedestrian space. Seems like many of these NYC businesses could do the same. https://www.google.com/maps/@32.8043505,-96.7993582,3a,75y,333.04h,77.83t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sX8LvS9utC6_1o8Mz1ef3zg!2e0!5s20171001T000000!7i13312!8i6656

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