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Andrew Cuomo

Next Stop for Bill to Expand Bus Lane Cameras: Andrew Cuomo’s Desk

Last night, the State Senate followed the Assembly's lead and passed a bill to continue New York City's bus lane camera enforcement program and expand it to an additional 10 bus routes. The bill now awaits Governor Andrew Cuomo's signature.

34th Street before bus lane cams. Video still: Streetfilms/Robin Urban Smith

The Senate voted 48 in favor and 11 opposed. The day before, the bill squeaked through the Assembly, 79-60, with former speaker Sheldon Silver joining Staten Island legislators in calling bus lane cameras "a trap for motorists."

The existing program was enacted by Albany in 2010 and limited the cameras to six Select Bus Service routes. Without an extension it will expire September 20. The new bill, sponsored by Assembly Member Nily Rozic and State Senator Martin Golden, not only extends the program five years but also allows the city to choose 10 additional bus routes for camera enforcement.

Camera-enforced bus lanes have boosted local bus speeds on 125th Street by up to 20 percent, according to DOT.

Some of New York's most important bus lanes predate Select Bus Service and aren't allowed to have camera enforcement under the current law. The Fifth Avenue bus lane, for instance, was implemented in the 1980s. It carries 90 buses per hour during the morning rush and moves 78,000 people daily, according to Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg.

The number of Select Bus Service routes has also grown beyond the limits of the current program. SBS on Webster Avenue in the Bronx operates without camera enforcement, and planned SBS routes on Utica Avenue, Woodhaven Boulevard, and along the Q44 route in Flushing and Jamaica will only be eligible for bus lane cameras if Cuomo signs the new bill.

Although the bill would eliminate the weekend prohibition on bus lane cams, it would retain the restriction that allows them only between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. (Most, but not all, of the city's bus lanes are not in effect outside those hours.) The fine would stay at $115.

The legislation allows cameras to be mounted on buses and at stationary locations, Rozic said before the Assembly vote, but DOT and the MTA have phased out bus-mounted devices in favor of cameras atop street poles.

"This is good news for bus riders, and will ensure we can continue expanding faster bus service citywide. We look forward to seeing it signed by the governor," said de Blasio spokesperson Wiley Norvell.

Cuomo's office says it is still reviewing the bill.

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