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Joe Lentol

Overcoming Skepticism, Lentol Joins Families to Back 20 MPH Speed Limit

Yesterday, members of Families for Safe Streets traveled to Albany to speak with legislators about legislation to lower NYC speed limits and increase automated enforcement of dangerous driving. They came away with an early victory: Assembly Member Joe Lentol of Brooklyn, a street safety ally who had been skeptical of a bill to lower the city's default speed limit to 20 mph, surprised the families by showing up at their press conference and giving a moving speech about why he now supports the measure.

"I understand why this is a difficult bill for some of my members, and for a lot of people. They believe that they can safely speed. Even I do. All of us do. We think that we have things under control, and that we are able to speed at will and be able to stop," said Lentol, who chairs the Assembly Codes Committee, which would play a key role in the bill's passage. "We’re wrong. We can’t always put our foot on the brake and stop the car."

"Speed kills," he said.

This morning, I asked Lentol, who has backed neighborhood slow zones and 20 mph speed limits on some of his district's most dangerous streets, why he had hesitated to come out in support of the bill, sponsored by Assembly Member Dan O'Donnell. "I think I misunderstood the O’Donnell bill," he said. The proposal would set a default citywide speed limit of 20 mph, while allowing the City Council to set higher speed limits where it sees fit. (For the record, since City Council members don't always let good policy guide their transportation decisions, this override power should rest with NYC DOT instead.)

"I don’t see why we can’t have a lower default rate of speed," Lentol said. "If you don’t see a speed limit sign that says 30 or 25, you as a driver have to understand that the default speed limit is 20. That should be the law."

Lentol's support came after families met with him in Albany yesterday. "It was a lack of understanding that this is a default, and there can be adjustments up," said Ellen Foote, whose son Sam Hindy was killed in a 2007 crash. "He listened to us."

Foote said she and her neighbors have been trying for years to get a lower speed limit on their residential street in Gowanus, but had struggled with city bureaucracy to get anything lower than the default 30 mph limit. "That is not the way the city should operate," she said. "It should be default, this is a given, and then you raise the speed limit where appropriate."

O'Donnell's bill has a companion in the Senate sponsored by Martin Malave Dilan. Lentol said passing speed limit legislation in Albany is "a heavy lift" and added that he was glad to see families of traffic violence victims speaking with legislators. “It all helps, and that especially helps -- the families that have experienced tragedies," he said. "It’s important for us to change the culture of the way we drive in New York City."

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