Skip to Content
Streetsblog New York City home
Streetsblog New York City home
Log In
Bridge Tolls

John Liu Releases a Bridge Toll Plan That Panders to Motorists

So John Liu has managed to take an excellent idea -- tolling the East River bridges -- and turn it into a policy disaster.

The key component of Liu's plan, which he says would raise $410 million annually, isn't the tolls -- it's the exemption for city residents. Here's what Liu said at an Association for Better New York event today:

To get that money, we would toll the East River Bridges for non-city residents. It's something that's been talked about before, and I think certainly makes sense, and is more realistic than a restoration of the commuter tax -- that I would love to see, but I'm not sure how open Albany would be.

Of course, Albany is just going to fall in love with a toll plan where Nassau, Suffolk, and Westchester pay, while New York City doesn't.

Here's an excerpt from the press release that accompanied the release of the "People's Budget" -- an overall fiscal plan that Liu released in his capacity as comptroller:

Tolling the East River Bridges would mean that membership -- or in this case, residency, New York City residency -- has its privileges. Non-residents commuting by car can and should contribute to the upkeep of our city's infrastructure.

By exempting motorists who live in the five boroughs, Liu's plan would not solve the city's transit funding problems -- the next MTA capital program will still have a gaping hole. (Compare Liu's $410 million to the $2.8 $1.5 billion projected net revenue from the Sam Schwartz plan.) While Liu suggested devoting revenue to "infrastructure," he also mentioned that it could be used for "offsetting increased city contributions to the MTA," which might just lead to tolls that pad other areas of the city budget.

It's somewhat baffling why Liu would propose a non-starter like this. Exempting millions of motorists negates the value of tolls as a tool to meaningfully reduce congestion, and it undermines the notion that motorists should pay for using roads. Let's hope this idea doesn't infect the other campaigns.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog New York City

Justice Dept., Citing Streetsblog Reporting, Threatens to Sue NYPD Over Cops’ Sidewalk Parking

The city is now facing a major civil rights suit from the Biden Administration if it doesn't eliminate illegal parking by cops and other city workers.

April 19, 2024

What to Say When Someone Claims ‘No One Bikes or Walks in Bad Weather’

Yes, sustainable modes are more vulnerable to bad weather. But that's why we should invest more in them — not less.

April 19, 2024

NYC Transit’s New Operations Planning Chief Wants To Fight ‘Ghost Buses’

One-time transit advocate and current MTA Paratransit VP Chris Pangilinan will oversee bus and subway operations for the whole city.

April 19, 2024

Friday’s Headlines: Gimme Bus Shelter Edition

The days of the Landmarks Preservation Commission reviewing every proposed bus shelter in landmarked districts may be no more. Plus more news.

April 19, 2024

Deal Reached: Hochul Says ‘Sammy’s Law’ Will Pass

The bill, though imperfect, has been four years in the making.

April 18, 2024
See all posts