Introducing the Streetsblog Network

netgrab2.jpgWe’ve just launched our shiny new transportation-policy blog network, and we’re pretty darn excited. You can find out why by clicking here.

Streetsblog Network (http://usa.streetsblog.org) brings together more than 100 blogs from 31 states — and counting. Its purpose is twofold: to create a place where people who blog on smart growth, livable streets and sustainable transportation issues can come together and learn from each other. And to provide a clearinghouse for information related to the transportation bill, or "TEA," that directs the spending of hundreds of billions of federal dollars. The next such bill is set to come up for reauthorization in 2009.

Federal transportation policy has long been a Beltway insider’s game, one where the highway lobby held most of the cards. This time, a coalition of organizations called Transportation for America has come together with the aim of taking the next TEA bill in a different direction.

We’ll be using the Streetsblog Network site to give readers and bloggers opportunities for action on the TEA bill, information about upcoming committee hearings — pretty much all the news on this legislation that we can get our hands on.

Think of it as a community that gets things done.

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A bill working its way through Congress may prompt federal officials to get a better handle on how transportation projects help or hinder access to jobs, education, and health care. The legislation, which passed out of a House Committee this week, calls for U.S. DOT to measure “the degree to which the transportation system, including public transportation, provides multimodal […]

T4A Calls for Smarter Jobs Policy

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In yesterday’s post about the Streetsblog Network‘s first birthday, I should have mentioned the crucial role that Transportation for America played in the network’s conception and inception. We couldn’t have done it without them. T4A’s vision of a national coalition of groups and individuals who can influence transportation policy at the federal level was key […]