Time-Lapse Scrambling in Toronto


Scramble from Sam Javanrouh on Vimeo.

Here is a mesmerizing time-lapse video from Spacing Toronto and photoblogger Sam Javanrouh. The clip shows traffic moving through Toronto’s pedestrian scramble — a.k.a. priority crossing, a.k.a. Barnes Dance — installed at Yonge and Dundas Streets last August.

There’s no music, so you’ll need your own soundtrack. We suggest the Beta Band’s "B + A"

  • rex

    The most amazing thing about that video is how many more people go through that intersection compared to cars. Any traffic engineer that has a broader definition of traffic than just cars should be able to see that cars are the limiting factor.

  • lee

    doesn’t look like any left or right turns are permitted which definitely changes things in terms of car/ped conflicts.

  • People seem to walk faster when they cross the street– Or is it just me?

  • Thanks for posting this- it could well be an ideal solution to a problem in our village. The one snag I see is that the trams don’t get priority over other traffic, which they normally would here.

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