Upstate Assembly Member Says City Delegation Killed Pricing

126.jpgWhat went on behind the closed doors of the Democratic conference the day congestion pricing died in the Assembly? According to a constituent letter from Binghamton rep Donna A. Lupardo, the "overwhelming majority" of New York City members were opposed to pricing, and upstate pols followed their lead.

Thank you for your recent email concerning Congestion Pricing for New
York City. As a committed environmentalist, I can appreciate how
important it is to reduce congestion (and the associated greenhouse
gases and asthma producing fumes), etc. It is also critical that we find
a way to pay for mass transit upgrades in New York City.

As you know, the congestion pricing bill did not come up for a vote in
either the State Assembly or the State Senate. Through six hours of
debate in the Democratic conference, the overwhelming majority of my
colleagues (all from New York City and the suburbs) expressed their
opposition. Honestly, the members representing Upstate New York could
not have possibly swayed the outcome. As we are often supported by our
New York City colleagues (e.g. The Upstate Revitalization Fund), many
felt obliged to defer to the opinions of those who represent New York City.

I’m sure that we have not heard the end of this matter. I will be sure
to keep your thoughts in mind as we move forward.

Sincerely,

Donna A. Lupardo

Member of Assembly

So where was Joan Millman when this was going down? Where were Micah Kellner and Richard Gottfried? Where was Sheldon "I probably would have voted for the bill" Silver? Did they speak up or stand down? Conveniently, we’ll never know.

By the way, you can place your free recruit-a-candidate ad here.

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