Congestion Pricing Bill, Take 3.

Liz Benjamin has the latest scoop on congestion pricing legislation in Albany:

The third version of a bill dealing with congestion mitigation in
the city was introduced yesterday in both houses of the state

The Assembly and Senate are scheduled to return to Albany Thursday
to take up this new bill – and nothing else. Each of them will be
eligible to collect $49 worth of taxpayer-funded per diem pay to cover
meals and other incidentals, and those who are traveling more than 50
miles will be eligible to put in for that to be publicly paid for, too.

NOTE: The full-day per diem is $152 while
the half-day is $49, I’m informed by the Speaker’s press office. The
mileage reimbursement depends on how far a lawmaker travels. Just FYI – and mine.

The measure,
which represents the four-way compromise hammered out by the governor,
legislative leaders and Mayor Bloomberg last week, is a program bill
from Gov. Eliot Spitzer.

Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver is the main sponsor in his house.
Co-sponsors include two of the most outspoken opponents to Bloomberg’s
congestion pricing plan – Assemblyman Richard Brodsky, of Westchester;
and Assemblyman Denny Farrell, of Manhattan; along with two who
supported the mayoral measure: Assemblyman Jim Brennan, of Brooklyn;
and Assembly Minority Leader James Tedisco, of Schenectady.

In the Senate, the bill is being sponsored by the mysterious Sen. Rules.

A reader sent along this helpful comparison
between the new bill and the Bloomberg bill the Senate moved out of
committee but never brought to the floor for a full vote after Senate
Minority Leader Malcolm Smith made himself a target of the mayor’s
wrath by saying that his members wouldn’t be voting unless there was a
deal with the Assembly.


Brennan Introduces Alternative Pricing Bill in Assembly

Assemblyman Jim Brennan, a Democrat from Brooklyn, has introduced a new congestion pricing bill, according to a statement released by his office. The bill contains some elements lifted from Mayor Bloomberg’s original proposal, including: Re-instating the $4 intrazonal fee Exempting drivers who cross into Manhattan below 60th Street but only drive on the periphery If […]

Paterson Backs Pricing, Introduces Bill in Albany

David Paterson is going to do right by his old State Senate district after all. New York’s new governor settled any doubts about his position on congestion pricing this afternoon, introducing a bill that follows the recommendations of the Traffic Congestion Mitigation Commission. The Daily Politics has the scoop: "Congestion pricing addresses two urgent concerns […]

Queens Legislator Offers Congestion Pricing Torpedo

Assembly Member Rory Lancman from Fresh Meadows, Queens has sent a three-page letter to his fellow legislators soliciting their support for a legislative alternate to Mayor Bloomberg’s congestion pricing proposal and long-term planning ominbus bill, Sewell Chan reports.  "Instead of threatening to beat New Yorkers over the head with a $2,000 a year stick if […]

Pricing Hearing: Sadik-Khan and Aggarwala Explain the Details

Yesterday morning’s hearing at City Hall, which garnered much press today, gave Janette Sadik-Khan and Rohit Aggarwala the chance to clarify a number of misconceptions about congestion pricing in front of a sizable contingent of City Council members. As expected, one of the first points to come up was whether drivers from New Jersey will […]

Congestion Pricing Endgame Begins

With less than four weeks remaining for the city to meet the $354 million federal deadline, lawmakers are positioning themselves on one side of the other of the congestion pricing debate, as state and city prime movers quietly ready for "negotiations." According to the Sun, Governor Eliot Spitzer’s office is drafting a congestion pricing bill, […]