Today’s Headlines

  • NYPD Confirms Workers Are Bearing the Brunt of de Blasio’s Pointless E-Bike Crackdown (Rag)
  • Cuomo Is Still Playing Games With the Subway (Politico, News, NYT)
  • Will Byford Reform the MTA’s Muddled Performance Metrics? (Voice)
  • American Prospect: Gateway Is Not a “Nice-to-Have Novelty”
  • De Blasio and Other Mayors to Waste Afternoon in DC (NY1)
  • Someone Tell Andrew Lanza Most New Yorkers Already Pay to Get Around (NY1)
  • DOT and MTA Will Hold L Shutdown Open House Tonight (NY1)
  • Brooklyn Pols Are Stressing Out Over the BQE (Bklyn Paper)
  • School Bus Drivers Hit Child, Woman in Separate Crashes in Jamaica and Harlem (NY1, News)
  • USPS Driver Runs Over Three People in Murray Hill Crosswalk (News, Post)
  • SI Driver Rips Car in Half and Narrowly Misses Bystanders — No Charges (Advance 1, 2; WNBC)
  • The Never Ending Struggle for Free Auto Storage in NYC (WCBS)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • Anxiously Awaiting Bikeshare

    So I figure this is as good a place as any to post. If the moderators think it’s irrelevant then feel free to delete:

    My offices just moved to 42nd/43rd street between 5th and 6th ave. Does anyone have a good way to get here? I take the Manhattan Bridge go up 1st ave and then…? Happy to go a few blocks out of the way for a more sane route. Also, any suggestions to get back to 2nd ave are appreciated, ideally south of the Midtown Tunnel nonsense. I was spoiled going to flatiron…

  • sbauman

    Here’s the simplest addition to your former route.

    From the Flatiron District take the 6th Ave bike lane uptown to 44th St. It’s protected until 32nd St and unprotected after. Use the bike lane on 44th St to 5th Ave. For the return, use Broadway from 42nd St to get back to the Flatiron District.

  • MasonEagle

    I note the media is already excusing the mail truck driver for running over those people, courting witness who said had a “blind spot” and thought he’d “run over a bump.” Absolute horseshit – reversing over a crosswalk without warning like that is an act of wanton recklessness which shows a complete disregard for human life. A responsible driver would have honked his horn repeatedly and backed up in tiny little steps. He just put it in reverse and floored it without warning. And why don’t these US mail trucks have sensors on the back? I hope each of those pedestrians sues USPS for millions of bucks. The driver should be in jail.

  • bolwerk

    That there are people who are spendthrift enough to want to organize their lives around automobiles, and cheap enough to find paying to store them too burdensome, should make for an endless well of comedy routines.

  • Anxiously Awaiting Bikeshare

    Thanks, that sounds like a good idea. I’ll give this a whirl tomorrow!

  • crazytrainmatt

    Nowhere else in the world have I seen the sort of reckless blind reverse driving you get regularly in NYC.

    That intersection also has two-way bike traffic in that exact spot at the connector between the 1st ave PBL and the east river greenway. The driver stopped just short of where the two-way PBL on 37th projects (but DOT doesn’t continue the green paint into the intersection).

  • Queens crash could have been avoided by Spilt phase signals… I will keep telling this to DOT and to all the activists until I am blue in the face or until everyone is safe .

  • Larry Littlefield

    So there you have it. Property tax increases in New York City to fund the Long Island Railroad.

    This is where the desperate grab for money is taking us. Now that Generation Greed is moving out and the generations to follow are concentrated here, they are going to destroy this city — and point the finger in a circle.

    https://larrylittlefield.files.wordpress.com/2017/11/chart4.jpg

    https://larrylittlefield.files.wordpress.com/2017/12/sl-tax-burden.jpg

  • Larry Littlefield

    Going home, I work my way over to Lex and down to 28th and below to avoid the tunnel traffic, unless I’m stopping at the Union Square farmer’s market, in which case I take 5th Broadway.

    Going to work, I waggle my way over to 6th on Chrystie, Bowery, Prince.

    I used to take Park both ways, then Vanderbilt to 43rd, before the construction of One Vanderbilt started. I’ll probably go back to that once it’s finished.

  • kevd

    Things I saw today that give me hope.
    1) A cop pulling over a car driving through Prospect Park
    2) A cop ticketing a food truck on Jay St. by the bridge who was parked all the way through the “buffer” so that any ordering customers would be 100% in the middle of the parking protected bike lane.

  • Elizabeth F

    > “If I were to put a bill out there that said, ‘From now on if you live in Manhattan, or the Bronx, or Brooklyn, or Queens and you want to come to Staten Island, we are going to charge you for that,'”

    Last time I checked, driving to Staten Island required the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, one of the most expensive in the region. But there is one FREE way to get to Staten Island from the other boroughs: ride your bike to Battery Park and take the FREE Staten Island Ferry. As far as I know, the congestion plan is not going to affect that.

  • kevd

    it actually costs exactly $11.52 to travel by car to staten island. this mythical bill is exactly what already exists.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Interesting article on Uber/Lyft cutting into CTA ridership.

    http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20180119/ISSUE05/180119872/whats-killing-cta-train-ridership-two-four-letter-words?AllowView=VDl3UXg1TzRDLzJCbXdEZkVlZnlmbHlvaDB3VkMrOVZIaGc9#utm_medium=email&utm_source=ccb-politics&utm_campaign=ccb-politics-20180124

    Basically, I’m not surprised. Fare and tax revenues is being diverted to debts and pensions in Chicago too, and on the weekend, those car service fares aren’t so bad if you are sharing the ride.
    Everyone else in my family is now using one of those services for some trips. I don’t, but then I bike.

  • stairbob

    Have the cops stopped blocking the bike lane on Broadway through Herald Square?

  • stairbob

    Are the car-sharing companies paying the city anything for the use of the on-street spaces? I’m sure they’d be happy to pay something if it saved them compared to what they pay in garages. Could be a good way to silence the complainers: “well, they are paying for it….”

    OTOH, I’m sure placard corruption will not be afraid to extend its footprint into these spaces… Should be interesting to see if they can work.

  • crazytrainmatt

    Nope!

  • stairbob

    Figures. Thanks.

  • Vooch

    indeed plus add those that think all interstates are free.

    Rolling on interstates is going mainstream

    LOL

  • Hilda

    At a CB discussion of car share in street parking spaces, the car share company can either move the car to a legal (non car share) spot within a half mile of the spot. Similar to what film crews do. Our CB Committee even asked if we could target locations where there is often rampant placard abuse, to allow the car share companies to keep these spaces clear, especially for (as one committee member called it) Paraphernalia Parking.

  • kevd

    ALSO! SI residents only pay 5.50 for the VZ bridge. That’s both ways.
    Everyone else pays 11.52 – $17 if you have a non-NY ez pass.
    The idiocy of Lanza argument is not only to we already pay to go to SI, we pay MORE than his constituents.

  • walks bikes drives

    And more to it – the reason why we in Manhattan would say it was ridiculous is why would you charge me to go to Staten Island? That would just add one more reason for me to not want to go to Staten Island, besides the fact that it is, you know, Staten Island…

  • qrt145

    The only time I’ve ever driven to Staten Island was the day I got distracted, missed an exit and somehow ended up on the Verrazano… an expensive mistake!

  • kevd

    i’d avoid manhattan too, if I could
    but, you know – work.
    and penn station for getting on trains.

  • reasonableexplanation

    Regardless of how much SI is or isn’t a destination in and of itself, many many people pay the toll to get through it and continue to points west and south. For the millions of people in Brooklyn, Queens, and Long Island, that’s the only way to get to NJ and beyond.

  • kevd

    Agreed.
    The VZ and SIE to central or southern NJ is the best way for many (if not most) drivers on geographic LI.
    But, current pricing actually encourages those BK, QNs and LI drivers to go out of their way to take free bridges into Manhattan and clog up the CBD instead.
    Seems ass-backward to me.

  • reasonableexplanation

    Honestly taking the manhattan route only makes sense outside of rush hours, where it might add about 15min to your trip, but cost 12 bucks less. During the morning/eve weekday rush you’re looking at about an extra hour to avoid the toll. I can’t imagine people regularly choosing an extra hour+ over $12.

    If I had to craft a moveNY type of plan, the VZ would be completely free, not just reduced cost (you wanna get out of NYC without going through the core? Go!), and the other MTA crossings would be the standard ez-pass rate plus whatever you need to add on to make up for revenue loss from the VZ.

  • What’s obnoxious is the fact that Staten Island is even part of New York City.

    They don’t want us; we don’t want them. Surely there must be a way to address this ongoing problem.

  • walks bikes drives

    Fun fact: in 1898(I believe I have the year right) when NYC became what it is by annexing Queens and Brooklyn against their will, Staten Island voted to voluntarily join as the 5th borough. And yet it is always the “forgotten borough.”

  • walks bikes drives

    Yeah, I’ll give you that it was totally obnoxious. But the heart of the point stands: Manhattan is a desirable destination, be it for work, play, or tourism for a very large number of people which causes extreme congestion. Staten Island is not and, outside of the St. George section, is predominantly suburban in all senses of the description. But sorry if I offended you – sincerely.

  • Not against their will. Both Queens and Brooklyn voted for Consolidation in the referendum of 1896, which took effect in 1898.

    While the savages of Richmond County voted for Consolidation in 1896, they voted to leave the City in 1993. Unfortunately, the City and State wouldn’t agree to it.

    They don’t identify as New Yorkers. So we should let them go. We’d have a better City without them.