Today’s Headlines

  • Select Bus Service Launches on the Q52/Q53 on Woodhaven Boulevard (NY1)
  • Subway Delays Up 4.5 Percent in September Compared to 2016 (NY1)
  • Driver Kills Taranjit Parmar, 18, After Fender-Bender on Hempstead Turnpike and Peels Off (News)
  • Woman Drives Mustang Into Two Kids and Through Front of House in Jamaica (News)
  • Man Assaults Uber Driver, Who Gets Into Car, Crashes and Dies on West Street Minutes Later (News)
  • A Muddled Look at Crash Rates and Street Safety From the Post
  • BQX Has No Tracks or Even a Route, But Here’s What a Streetcar Might Look Like (Post)
  • 9-Page MTA Memo Tells Subway Conductors to Steer Clear of Canned Service Announcements (News)
  • Tony Avella Now Blaming Every Fender-Bender on Northern Boulevard on a Bike Lane (QChron, TL)
  • Pity the Sorry Souls Who Get Cheap Parking on Manhattan Streets (Post)
  • What Should We Name the MetroCard Replacement? (AMNY)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • Larry Littlefield

    “Albert said he was trying to cook up his own catchy name for the new system, but he had “nothing for publication” as of yet.”

    Styx.

    After all, even with investment — likely to halt with the next recession — the self serving deals of Generation Greed are likely to make the subway hell for the forseeable future.

  • Maggie

    Transit expansions shouldn’t be zero-sum, but it’s frustrating to read Cuozzo’s latest column about NYC’s midtown hotel construction projects, including this line:

    “More visitors aren’t just annoying to locals who have to share the same space on the subways and streets, especially during the holiday season. They are creating a demand for hotels that threatens to lay waste to the entire city.”

    with no mention of the additional crosstown transit the city’s visitors will need, and sensible steps to cut the insane number of single-occupant vehicles already ruining midtown street life.

    Especially frustrating in context of the shiny Two Trees streetcar prototype imagery.

  • HamTech87

    lol. I expect another $1M “Cuomo genius” prize competition is coming. Also, won’t there also be the option to use your phone or even have the RFID in your pocket so you don’t have to tap anything?

    Anyway, I would suggest AppleCard or BigAppleCard but I figure someone in Cupertino would sue me.

  • Larry Littlefield

    I just hope there isn’t a pause at the turnstile as the system reads and verifies the card or phone, as is the case in Chicago. That could lead to a back-up at the turnstile instead of a speed-up. There would have to be some kind of pre-payment with information on stored value staying on the card or phone.

  • Larry Littlefield

    People like us vs. people like them. Same old tribalist crap. If you don’t want to be around visitors, move to some exclusive suburb somewhere! You won’t have to see them, and we won’t have to hear from you!

  • bolwerk

    The Citadis 405 looks like it would be a perfect feeder from the outer boroughs to the narrow streets in Lower Manhattan.

    But I’d think a considerably larger vehicle could work over most of the proposed BQX route. Though it also looks like the Citadis can have significantly more articulated segments too.

  • bolwerk

    There is an absurd delay in Philly (for anyone used to the instantaneousness of a MetroCard swipe, anyway).

    Guess it kind of depends how robust their networking infrastructure is though. Even without stored value on the card, I don’t think a few million small, encrypted transactions an hour would be much difficulty for modern fiber network. In real-world practice transaction data could be cached where people are expected to be, much as modern reverse proxies cache data based on geography, and reconciled with a central server later – later might be seconds or less as part of a larger batch transaction. (Example: you use the same subway station every morning, so a local database node expects you and has your data ready. In case you sleep over at a friend’s far away from your home node, it might take longer for the system to pull your data. But if designed properly, it should still be instantaneous as far as your feeble hu-man brane is concerned.)

    Also, is it just me, or has the MetroCard managed a surprising degree of data integrity and security over the years? Or did I just miss that it was long ago hax0red? I remember a few cases where exploits occurred, but they were generally closed AFAIK.

  • AMH

    “Ladies and gentlemen” is a perfectly dignified way to address the public. All of the system-wide announcements this weekend began with a surly “Hello everyone.” It was incredibly annoying, especially with 4-6 announcements playing in a row. I’d rather get rid of this noise pollution altogether.

  • bolwerk

    Less is more, and there’s no need for fake courtesy from a computer system everyone knows doesn’t care about you. If there really is an important announcement to make, precede it with a single tone or note and say what needs to be said.

    Otherwise don’t make any announcements because, well, it just trains people to ignore them so they won’t hear them when they are important.

  • AMH

    Less IS more. There should really be a push to cut down on words while still meeting ADA requirements.

  • kevd

    signal to noise ratio is an important and often overlooked aspect of effective communication, whether it be from a conductor or on group emails in a work setting.

  • kevd

    on the bright side they’re bringing in hardware from France, so maybe, just maybe they’ll bring in some french thinking on grade separation and routing.

  • kevd

    “Threatens to lay waste to the entire city”
    This man is a complete, fucking moron.

  • djx

    ” lay waste to the entire city.”

    Godzilla? Or Rodan?

  • Reggie

    You could probably just move to Sunset Park.

  • Reggie

    Full page advertisements in all the local papers, an op-ed in the Brooklyn Downtown Star, a cocktail party for movers-and-shakers tonight at the Brooklyn Navy Yard and now the unveiling of the street car. When you see lobbyists rallying like this, it reveals their own fear that the end is nigh.

  • The best way is “attention, passengers”.

  • bolwerk

    Well, not sure there are many other options for that kind of equipment coming off the shelf. Stadler and Alstom probably control most of the non-legacy market. Siemens and Bombardier seem like weaker players, and at least Kawasaki and a few other firms could probably fill a custom order.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Hotels are “laying waste” there too.

  • Maggie

    There’s a case that too much tourism, especially heavily concentrated in certain pockets of the city, takes away the relevance and the appeal to those of us who live here everyday. Like for example, I rarely go to Grand Central Terminal, but every time I do I wish there were fewer tourists to dodge. That helps explain why NYC’s tourism agency is advertising further-flung locations across the five boroughs.

    There’s a thoughtful column to write on this and the city could do much more to plan out how it wants to look, not 10-15 years from now, but in 4 weeks, when it’s mid-December and sidewalks are miserably crowded with holiday foot traffic because we haven’t expanded the pedestrian areas, and we’re all just crossing our fingers everything works. I agree that Cuozzo probably isn’t the guy to write that column. Maybe Nicole Gelinas writes it? It’s disappointing, every year that de Blasio doesn’t have the foresight to get us where we ought to be.

  • kevd

    i like the “respected passengers” they pull out on the Moscow Metro.

  • JTP Choons

    How about just “yo.”

  • AnoNYC

    In the videos the director mentioned that they had options of various lengths (up to 200 ft I think). I believe the pilot is just a shortened version for preview.

  • JonDubno

    The reason those tourists are here is the same reason that you are here.

  • JonDubno

    It wasn’t an Uber driver according to the cited article, but your headline says that he was. Which was it?

  • Maggie

    what does that even mean? I promise you, I’m not walking around with a selfie stick and comparing ticket prices for the big bus tours.

  • AMH

    If only.

  • AMH

    But I thought we were “customers” now? Soon we’ll be “guests” or “comrades”.

  • AMH

    I like the brevity of monosyllabic speech, at least.

  • JonDubno

    You presumably like the culture, the food, the arts scene, the architecture and so on.

    So do they. Those crowds are a direct result of you liking things that are too popular

  • JarekFA

    He’s an uber driver but he wasn’t logged in for uber at the time. The car has a T license plate indicating that it’s a FHV.

  • Maggie

    My point was more that I like Grand Central as a well-designed place where I catch trains.

    That’s quite different from liking it as a place to go and stand around half an hour and take a selfie. I don’t mean to trash the tourism industry, at all, but it’s an empirical truism that the more people standing around a place, the less functional it is *as a train station*.

    Flip the analogy. What’s the last city you visited? Can you imagine, in all seriousness, telling a local in the middle of his daily routine: I’m here for the same reason you are?

    My point is that there’s a reason places strive to avoid becoming tourist traps, and tourists hunt for tips to avoid them.

  • qrt145

    Hey, it could be worse. You could be at Penn Station. I’ll take Grand Central with all the tourists over Penn Station any day of the week! 🙂

    That said I do agree that excessive tourism does get in the way of function, even if it also has its benefits.

  • JonDubno

    Fair points. Nonetheless, if somebody chooses to live in a city like New York or San Francisco then there is a reasonable expectation that you will spend a lot of your time being delayed or obstructed by gaggling groups of tourists.

    Move to Detroit or Lubbock, and your days will be blessedly tourist-free,