Today’s Headlines

  • Ethel Rubenstein, 69, Killed by Driver in Borough Park Last Night (WNBCAP)
  • Hit-and-Run Driver Kills Antonio Ramirez, 40, Where DOT Rejected Slow Zone (Post, WNBC, News)
  • Witnesses: Taxi Driver Ran Red, Critically Injuring Self in Midtown Crash; NYPD: No Charges (News)
  • MTA May Consider Articulated Subway Trains, Which Boosted Capacity in Toronto by 10 Percent (NYT)
  • Jimmy Vacca Is Worried That DOT Won’t Expand Slow Zones Quickly Enough (Bronx Times)
  • Post Ignores Biz Community Support, Seeks Out Retailers Against Amsterdam Avenue Traffic Calming
  • Crain’s Looks at NYPD Contenders, Including Bratton
  • Chris Ward: “The Governor Has Realized” He Can’t Fund Capital Projects on Fares and Tolls (CapNY)
  • Mayoral Candidate Jack Hidary Talks Taxis, Technology and Paris Car-Share (NYT)
  • Construction Begins on New SIRR Station, Replacing Two Other Stations and Adding Parking (DNA)
  • To Compete With WSJ’s Rabinowitz, Someone Get Nora Ephron’s Sister on Video (NYT, Bklyn Spoke)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Anonymous

    Brooklyn Spoke’s riposte to Ephron (the last link in today’s headlines) is the most scintillating piece about New York City and cycling I’ve seen in a long while.

  • krstrois

    I agree. I’d say something, but he already said everything one could possibly say, and without being personally vicious. Way to go, Doug.

  • Papa Smurf

    Did you know that long before Citi Bike, almost every corner in NYC had something blue on it? It’s true!

  • Clarke

    I like Ephron’s argument involving newspaper boxes…as though DOT street redesigns created the free newspaper industry?

  • Jonathan R

    I remember back in the early 90s hearing writing teachers suggest that having one’s personal essay published on the Times Op-Ed page was the acme of achievement in the personal-essay world. I bet the page editors are still getting hundreds of submissions daily.

    So what’s the Times’s excuse for publishing these kind of vapid, meaning-free ramblings when there are presumably so many alternatives in their slush pile? If I want to read Delia Ephron’s random thoughts I’ll bookmark her blog.

  • Anonymous

    Yes Brooklyn Spoke’s rebuttal is great–but the one point (made by Nicole Gelinas) not mentioned, that bears repeating, is that the intersection Ephron complains of has a dedicated bicycle signalhead with a split phase so that left-turning motor vehicles alternate, rather than conflicting with, bicycle traffic. In this google maps view, you see a van turning left across the bike path on a left turn green arrow, while the bike-form red signal governs bicycle traffic:

    https://maps.google.com/maps?q=19th+Street+tenth+avenue+manhattan&hl=en&ll=40.743323,-74.003692&spn=0.028385,0.066047&sll=40.697488,-73.979681&sspn=0.904777,2.113495&t=h&hq=19th+Street&hnear=10th+Ave,+Manhattan&z=15&layer=c&cbll=40.743562,-74.00352&panoid=omqVH6u–hI0sjyzs0sGCg&cbp=12,158.63,,0,-3.27

    But here’s how Ephron describes this split-phase arrangement:

    “To the left of the left turn lane is the bicycle lane. I hope you can visualize this because it’s nuts. The cars are making left turns into the bicycles.”

    How lazy can you get, to denounce a traffic improvement without actually spending so much as a five-minute signal cycle observing how it actually works?

  • Keith Williams

    You’d think the standards for someone with name-recognition would be much, much higher. I’m very disappointed in the NYT here.

  • Eric McClure

    I guess Jim Walden and Seniors for Safety have no comment on Ethel Rubenstein’s death, eh?

  • Anonymous

    Some years ago the Times opinion pages (online at least) used to say that they generally did hold the publication bar higher for pieces written by those already well-known. Didn’t seem to be true then, and certainly not now, now that they don’t bother making that claim anymore (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/14/opinion/op-ed-and-you.html?_r=0).

  • Anonymous

    Some years ago the Times opinion pages (online at least) used to say that they generally did hold the publication bar higher for pieces written by those already well-known. Didn’t seem to be true then, and certainly not now, now that they don’t bother making that claim anymore (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/14/opinion/op-ed-and-you.html?_r=0).

  • Ian Turner

    That was hilarious. “Yes, we do fact check” indeed.

  • Kevin Love

    Oh No! The Post Office is begriming our streets!