Today’s Headlines

  • Driver Slams Into Willets Point Auto Shop, Killing One and Injuring Two (Post, DNA, Times Ledger)
  • Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Against Taxi E-Hail Apps (Observer, Crain’s, CapNY, WSJ, NYT)
  • It’s Time to Plug the Bike Lane Gaps in Central Queens (DNA)
  • On SBS And Local Buses, MTA Fare Inspectors Nabbed 57,000 Fare-Beaters in Five Years (News)
  • Josh Barro: Reduce Turnover at the Top of the MTA; Raise the Salary (Bloomberg)
  • In Court, Victim Describes Injuries Received After Cabbie Ran Over Passengers He Refused (Post)
  • Off-Duty NYPD Sergeant Sends Man to Hospital Over Parking Space (Post)
  • New Bike-Share Stations, Plaza Space Being Installed in Astor Place (NYT)
  • Alison Cohen Departs Alta Bike-Share for Job at Toole Design (Crain’s)
  • Hoboken Launches Hybrid Bike-Share/Rental Program Without Docking Stations (MTR)
  • Bike-Share Installers Endure Abuse From Angry People Afraid of New Things (WNYC)
  • Scenes From Sunday’s Ghost Bike Memorial Ride (Voice)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Ian Turner

    Why am I not surprised to learn that Randy Mastro is involved in the taxi app lawsuit.

  • Bolwerk

    MTA has a dogged obsession with doing collection wrong. They should do POP on all buses. (“SelectBus” is a kind of ironic term, if you think about it. They “select” a few lines to do properly, and let everyone suffer elsewhere.)

  • Sean Kelliher

    Unfortunately, one more motor vehicle jumps sidewalk and crashes into building story – this one in Park Slope, Brooklyn – from the NY Post – http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/brooklyn/van_crashes_into_park_slope_deli_8lo5eSavDUi1ws7Y11f49K

  • Perhaps part of the problem with the NYPD’s lame reactions to motor vehicle fatalities is that these newspapers and web news outlets act like they hardly care about it in their coverage? “Someone died. Meh.” They put more effort into stories about cats stuck in trees.

  • Jeff

    This plaza space at Astor Pl… This is just a POPS related to and on the site of the new building (the Deathstar)? Not the larger overhaul that will reclaim romping grounds from vehicles that was announced a little while ago?

  • Anonymous

    @disqus_StgnOI20PN:disqus That’s right, this is not the on-street plaza.

  • I think this is just for property owned by the building and not part of any broader DDC reconstruction of Astor Place. It’s hard to tell, but I think that per this old presentation (http://www.nyc.gov/html/mancb3/downloads/cb3docs/Jan_6_2011_Presentation_to_CBs_2_and_3.pdf) the DDC reconstruction does not include any space that falls within the property line of the new building and I think all of the pictures show work being done on private property. I’d love to know when the reconstruction was set to start since that presentation is from January of 2011.

  • Jeff

    That’s disappointing. I’ve never really liked these POPS. At the macro level, their form always seems to borrow a page from the anti-urban Le Corbusier “towers-in-a-park” BS, and at the micro level, they stubbornly refuse to use the same design language as NYC’s more traditional parks and plazas (hexagonal asphalt blocks, iron railings/fences, the iconic NYC elongated wooden bench, etc.).

  • Daphna

    Does the City Council currently have term limits? Wikipedia says in 1993 a referendum imposed two year term limits on City Council members and on other city elected officials. However, in 1996 voters did not support a City Council proposal to extend term limits. A term is 4 years. But there are city council members serving many more than 8 years. James Oddo as an example is serving his 15th year.

  • Daphna

    Does the City Council currently have term limits? Wikipedia says in 1993 a referendum imposed two year term limits on City Council members and on other city elected officials. However, in 1996 voters did not support a City Council proposal to extend term limits. A term is 4 years. But there are city council members serving many more than 8 years. James Oddo as an example is serving his 15th year.

  • Vulnerable citizens

    It’s hard to imagine any improvement without independent oversight of the NYPD. When officers are charged with vehicular crimes so frequently it makes the headlines a few days a week (without counting all the “professional courtesy” crimes swept under the rug), there is a clear assault on public safety by those we entrust to protect us.

  • NYC has a limit of two-terms. The 2008 vote to extend the limit to three terms was overturned by a referendum in 2010. However, people who were already in office can still serve three terms. So council members who were in office before the 2010 referendum, which is just about all of them, can serve up to three terms. New council members elected this year can serve up to two terms. I don’t have an explanation for Oddo’s 15-year tenure off the top of my head.

  • Bolwerk

    Yes, but I think current law is a three-term limit, which they extended from a two-term limit so they so they could all run again in 2009. See, there was a crisis at the time, and we needed sensible, stable leadership. It helped a lot, obviously.

    I’m not sure about the nittygritty details, but I think the limits started at the time the law was enacted so anybody in place before still could get two (then three) more terms.

  • Daphna

    Was the extension in 2009 for a third term for city council members a one-shot thing? Or does it mean the new term limit is 3 terms? Or is it still 2 terms (as long as they do not vote themselves more extensions)?

    Also, Christine Quinn and two others have been in office since 1999 so that means those three are into their 4th term. Why didn’t the two (or three) term limit apply?

  • Daphna

    Christine Quinn, Michael Nelson and James Oddo have all been on the City Council since 1999 which seems defies the 3 term limit.

    Thank you so much for your explanation. I am relieved that other council members hopefully will serve only 12 years and the newer ones only 8.

  • CheapSkate

    BikeShare stations are being installed today at Washington Square East at Waverly, Great Jones Street west of Lafayette and LaGuardia Place at W 3rd Street

  • Andrew

    There are over 15,000 bus stops across the city. Implementing SBS-style POP on all buses would require installing a bare minimum of 30,000 fare machines (one MetroCard machine and one cash machine per stop), even though many of the stops rarely see more than a few riders per bus. The fare inspection (Eagle) team would have to be enlarged 75-fold.

    In a few years, MetroCard will be phased out and all of the machines will become obsolete. The replacement system is being designed to permit smartcard payments at all doors of the bus (although I don’t know if it’s been decided whether to use that feature only for SBS or for all bus routes – the answer probably depends on the availability of inspectors).

    Are you seriously suggesting that the MTA should immediately proceed to install over 30,000 fare machines across the city, only to rip them all out in a few years? I’d rather see the machines installed on a handful of bus routes that benefit the most from off-board fare payment and let the rest wait until machines are unnecessary.