Bike Miami: Car-Free Under the Palm Trees

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Yesterday Miami became the latest American city to pull off a big car-free event, when an estimated 2,000 people (including mayor Manny Diaz) took to the streets for Bike Miami. Mike Lydon at Transit Miami reports:

South Miami Avenue was much more like an urban plaza than a street. Did you notice how the cafe seating and active retail edges allowed people to watch the active participants promenade through what became more a stage than a street? It was a beautiful event and instructive. Indeed, I have never seen such an exercise of urbanism within downtown Miami. The event clearly demonstrates the wonderful potential of downtown Miami and I think the event’s organizers and participants now understand what livable streets can mean for the health of downtown Miami.

Clarence Eckerson and the Streetfilms crew have been all over the wave of Ciclovía-inspired events this year, filing reports from ChicagoNew York, Portland and San Francisco. As for videos of Bike Miami, some hand-held footage has surfaced on YouTube, and after the jump we’ve got the introductory remarks from Mayor Diaz and local district commissioner Joe Sanchez.

Photo of South Miami Avenue: Transit Miami

Video: 305librarian

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