Wiki Wednesday: Zero VMT Vehicles

Aerorider_Sun_Microsystems.jpg
In a StreetsWiki entry on zero VMT vehicles, Streetsblog regular gecko proposes that a focus on shifting mode share to human-powered vehicles like bikes and the Aerorider (right) would be the most efficient means to bring necessary reductions in greenhouse gases, and would transform Manhattan, for one, into a bright green paradise.

Since it is only people that are being moved, using modular vehicles the size and weight of human beings, and optimally much smaller, is a much better, more agile and cost-effective way to move them. Bicycles would be the first step in achieving such systems, by converting 40% of New York City travel to cycling, as in Amsterdam and Copenhagen. Borrowing from successes of Parisian Vélib and German public bike systems, scaled up to significantly service New York’s 8.5 million daily commuter population, will be the most expedient cost-effective first step in implementing modern and immediately valuable transit improvements.

Ultimately, if zero VMT vehicles replace standard vehicles there may be justification to consider them negative VMT vehicles; doubly so if they can serve as modular components of transit systems to greatly improve systemic efficiencies, practicality, and costs.

We could see this entry being expanded with info, for instance, on how bike share can serve to complement existing transit systems by relieving overcrowding. Any takers? If so, sign up for Livable Streets account to add to this or any other article.

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