Wiki Wednesday: Bicycle-Friendly Communities Awards

Last week, the League of American Bicyclists announced the most recent additions to the ranks of Bicycle Friendly Communities, which means this StreetsWiki entry is ripe for an update:

bike-friendlycom1.jpgThe Bicycle-Friendly Communities Campaign is an awards program administered by the

League of American Bicyclists
that recognizes municipalities actively supporting bicycling. [1]
Cities wishing to be designated a Bicycle-Friendly Community complete
an application which covers bicycling facilities as well as related
traffic enforcement, promotion of bicycling, and education of
bicyclists and drivers to create a better environment for bicycling.

The League of American Bicyclists recognizes newly
designated Bicycle Friendly Communities with an awards ceremony, a
Bicycle-Friendly Community road sign, and a formal press announcement.
As of May 2008, only two communities — Davis, California, and
Portland, Oregon — had received a platinum rating, the highest
available. There were 82 cities designated gold, silver, or bronze. A
total of 212 communities had applied for BFC designation since the
program’s inception in 2003.

The League has been admirably stingy in doling out the coveted platinum rating. Now there’s a third city joining Portland and Davis at the top of the ranks: Boulder, Colorado. (New York’s a bronze.)

If, like me, you’re curious about how Boulder has become a great biking town, stay tuned to Streetfilms. Clarence Eckerson is on location this very moment, gathering footage and interviews to tell the story.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

DOT Secy Wants “Sustained Engagement” from Bike Advocates

|
OK, so we still really don’t like the name of the DOT Secretary’s blog, The Fast Lane. (Not to mention the design — could someone do something about those graphics, please?) But more and more, we like what we’re reading there. Like yesterday’s post, titled "Bicycling Is an Important Factor in Less Carbon-Intensive Commuting," in […]

Is DOT Doing Enough to Make NYC Bike-Friendly?

|
The question was debated, albeit briefly and in slow motion, by two New York City Department of Transportation employees in the pages of the New York Times last week. Last week, in a Sunday City section op/ed piece, Andrew Vesselinovitch argued that DOT is not doing enough for New York City cyclists. Vesselinovitch is the […]

Trek: A Bike Maker Flexes Some Advocacy Muscle

|
One thousand Trek Lime "cruising bicycles," waiting for riders. David Vandenberg of Transportation Alternatives recently returned from Trek Bicycle’s 2008 sales meeting in Madison, Wisconsin where he reports the manufacturer of Lance Armstrong’s high-tech racing bike is positioning itself as corporate America’s leading bicycling advocate: Billed as "major product announcement," Trek President John Burke unveiled […]

More Conversation About Not-So-Invisible Bicyclists

|
The other day, we wrote a post in hopes of starting a conversation about the way certain groups of people who ride bicycles — notably, immigrants who ride to work and for work — tend to get overlooked by bicycle advocacy groups and planners. The post (which grew out of an item by Streetsblog Network […]

NYC Gets Its First-Ever Physically-Separated Bike Path

|
The Department of Transportation revealed plans for New York City’s first-ever physically-separated bike lane, or "cycle track," at a Manhattan Community Board 4 meeting last night. The new bike path will run southbound on Ninth Avenue from W. 23rd to W. 16th Street in Manhattan. Unlike the typical Class II on-street bike lane in which […]