Today’s Headlines

  • gecko

    “Motorized Scooters Gaining Converts (City Room)” are also part of the way there to truly serious urban transport. Electric is better, lighter weight, more suitable to transit, automation, and zero emissions.

  • Larry Littlefield

    How about those power assist bikes? I’ve seen a few around lately, but don’t know much about them.

  • Competitive Primaries

    Out collecting signatures for Paul Newell this morning. A lot of apathy, but also a lot of people tired of shelly silver’s obstructionist game

  • CPingenot

    Did anyone read the comments on the phoenix article?
    Scary anti-bike sentiment! For the sake of those biking in Phoenix, I hope those are just a few trolls.

  • gecko

    2. Larry Littlefield “How about those power assist bikes?”, Optibike (www.optibike.com) has performed quite well at the annual “Tour de Sol” though very expensive, kind of seems like state of the art.

    A recumbent version with a comfy seat would be more serious. A recumbent trike would eliminate the balancing act.

    For the sports minded, athletic and even “edgy” types the standards will always be around.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Two bad Newell & Henry don’t live in different districts. It’s not as if we have a surplus of challengers.

    Then again, if the press is willing to pay attention because of who they are running against, perhaps they’ll both get enough publicity for it to be worth trying again in two years, this time in different places.

  • JF

    One of them could have run against Connor, but he’s already got a challenger or two. We like Nadler and Velazquez, although people could always use a choice.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Forget federal. It’s going to get better. Forget the city. It’s much better than it was. The problem is the state.

  • Larry Littlefield

    While I feel sorry for the Midwest, its representatives have fought for the right to increase our oil dependence for 25 years, a profitable strategy (for them) during that time, and the region is now feeling the consequences.

    “The plant closure nearly marks the end of GM’s dominance in a town that once housed five of the auto maker’s presidents in the late 1960s, said John Heitmann, a history professor at University of Dayton. ‘Next to Detroit and Flint, this was number three, Heitmann said of the Dayton area. ‘That’s a lot of power. This was a great GM town.'”

    “Heitmann said he had thought the area’s skilled labor pool and favorable geography would entice the automaker to keep the plant open, but its future was ultimately doomed by what he called an outmoded product — the fuel-guzzling SUV.”

    “There are going to be a lot of houses for sale…We’ll see people leave this area. This is a dying town.”

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24956243/

    I thought New York City was they dying town? Maybe not, unless Albany kills it off.

  • moocow

    That Ikea is such bad idea. There is no easy way in or out of there to the BQE. Now there will be a huge increase in traffic through Red Hook Park. I don’t get it, the City let Ikea fill in a Drydock, situate themselves at the end of a pennisula approached only by back roads, and for what? Crappy furniture not made here? I wish I could see an end to our -America’s- appetite for cheap s@!t at the expense of our countries well being.

    I can see that big blue box from my house, certainly fuel to my frustration.

  • I have to ride down and take a look at the IKEA. From what I can tell, the location is a disaster, but then again, planning in NYC is pretty much a disaster.

  • Toronto’s plan to remove the freeway is more exciting than critical mass taking it over. It is at http://spacing.ca/wire/2008/05/30/gardiner-to-come-tumbling-down-kind-of/ and is linked from the article about critical mass.

    But look at the suburban-highrise-style design that they have in their visualizations of what it could look like without the freeway.

  • Eric

    Re: IKEA, I love it, they won’t even release the number of locals whom they’ll be employing, which was perhaps the biggest selling point for building it there. Who wants to bet that it’s… hardly any.

    And has anyone else noticed that the buses display “IKEA Terminal” on their electronic route signs. Shouldn’t IKEA be paying for that free advertising?