State Senator’s Car is Towed During Congestion Pricing Meeting

Dilan2007NEWHEADSHOTBIO.jpgSources who wish not to be named send along the following story:

State Senator Martin Malave Dilan, who hasn’t yet come out in favor of congestion pricing despite the fact that only 2 percent of the people who live in his Brooklyn district are regular car commuters, was attending a congestion pricing
meeting at State DOT headquarters in Long Island City yesterday. When he exited the building, much to his
surprise, his personal car, a 1992 Mercury Capri with vanity plate “NYC67” was
missing. After some sleuthing he discovered the culprit: An NYPD tow truck
operator doing his job. Dilan had parked in a bus stop.

Dilan’s office declined to comment.

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