Jane Jacobs and the Future of New York: Urban Detectives

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In the spirit of Jane Jacobs, children ages 8 to 12 can go and explore Greenwich Village — the neighborhood she called her home and fought to save. Equipped with detectives’ notebooks, junior detectives will investigate the city fabric, secretly observe people moving through town, discover the history of older buildings, learn to read building facades and ghost walls, search for an underground brook, and maybe even make sense of Village street patterns! During this fun and interactive tour, children will gain some understanding of the huge impact that urban planning has on our lives and the importance of being involved.

Leader: Sylvia Laudien-Meo, art historian

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