Trek: A Bike Maker Flexes Some Advocacy Muscle


One thousand Trek Lime "cruising bicycles," waiting for riders.

David Vandenberg of Transportation Alternatives recently returned from Trek Bicycle’s 2008 sales meeting in Madison, Wisconsin where he reports the manufacturer of Lance Armstrong’s high-tech racing bike is positioning itself as corporate America’s leading bicycling advocate:

Billed as "major product announcement," Trek President John Burke unveiled the company’s One World Two Wheels program at this year’s sales meeting. Through the program Trek is committing $1.6 million over the next three years to support the League of American Bicyclists’ Bicycle Friendly Community Campaign and a few other projects. Here is how Trek’s web site puts it:

We all know the world has some problems; gas is expensive and cars
pollute, the roads are congested and humans are getting bigger. And not
in a good way.

Luckily, there is a solution to these problems. A solution that burns
calories, not gas. It doesn’t waste fuel sitting in traffic. Something
that could even bring communities closer together.

The solution is the bicycle.

As part of the program, Burke asked the assembled dealers to work with Trek to increase bike trips from one percent of total U.S. mode share to five percent by 2017.

"Bicycling is a very simple solution to many complicated problems in the world," said Burke. "I believe that
the contribution from Trek can significantly
increase the resources of the Bicycle Friendly Communty’s program and help make the dream of
a bike-friendly America become a reality."

Following the presentation, 1,000 Trek Lime bicycles were handed over to attendees to ride en masse to dinner at a location about two miles away. Before sending off the crowd, Burke noted that 40 percent of all trips in the United States are within two miles of home and 50 percent of the working population commutes five miles or less to work.

Then one thousand cyclists took over the town for a night. Bikes were everywhere, at every bar, on every path and every intersection.

Four hundred miles west of Detroit’s sputtering automakers, Madison, Wisconsin got a sneak peak at the future of urban American transportation.


Leading the Tour de Lime: Trek President John Burke wearing the red jersey.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

How to Plan Good Cities for Bicycling

|
Editor’s note: This is the final installment in our series this week featuring Danish architect and livable streets luminary Jan Gehl. The pieces are excerpts are from his book, “Cities for People,” published by Island Press. Donate to Streetsblog and Streetfilms and you’ll qualify to win a copy of the book, courtesy of Island Press. […]

5 Borough Bike Club Meeting: Ask the Bike Shop Pros

|
The 5 Borough Bicycle Club’s March meeting will be an exclusive after-hours opportunity for club members, accompanied guests and prospective club members to ask Charlie McCorkell and his mechanics about bikes and accessories (or even what it takes to run a small business!) and to get recommendations for the Spring season. Charlie is a civil engineer by training […]

“A Bicycle Is Not a Transportation Device”

|
Did you commute by bike this morning? (I’m not at the office yet today, but that’s how I’m going to get there.) If so, you might be surprised to hear that "a bicycle is not a transportation device." Those are the perplexing words of John Cook, a supervisor in Fairfax County, Virginia.  The FABB Blog […]