Transit-Oriented Development in Jersey City

jersey_city_TOD.jpg

Last week Alec posted a vision for transit-oriented development that was met by the Streetsblog commenters with less than universal enthusiasm. While we are on the subject, I submit a vision being acted upon that I find close to ideal. Here we see Jersey City, specifically the two blocks of Newark Avenue between Erie Street and Christopher Columbus Drive. The large building under construction in the background sits atop the Grove Street PATH station, a spot of land that represented an excellent opportunity for high density growth because it was formerly a collection of parking lots with a half dozen low-rise buildings including what looks like it was an automobile service garage. 

New Jersey has come to understand the importance of transit-oriented development, and people are making it happen over there. Here, the new apartments blend in with and compliments the older fabric, which has been preserved. We have a neighborhood that has a mixture of uses that supports a streetscape with a diverse cast of characters and a never ending intricate sidewalk ballet. It is great to see this type of growth fueling the rebirth of New Jersey’s cities. If they have the same economic forces at work as we have in New York City, this will prove to be so popular that the challenge will be to ensure that people at all income levels can enjoy this rebuilt neighborhood.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

T is for Transit-Oriented Development

|
Planning a city around transit doesn’t mean you have to cluster everything inside the core business district. Copenhagen, whose thoughtful bike network we’ve explored elsewhere, recently commissioned Chelsea-based architect Steven Holl to design T-Husene, a place for living and working outside the core city. The architect’s renderings, released November 2, fit into a town that […]

Sneak Preview of Bloomberg’s 21st Century Urban Vision

|
As reported in today’s Observer a team working under Deputy Mayor Dan Doctoroff has, for the last year or so, been secretly developing a sweeping, new urban planning vision for New York City. In its scope and ambition, the Observer compares the plan to the 1811 layout of Manhattan’s street grid system and the 1929 […]

How Portland Sold Its Banks on Walkable Development

|
Gresham, Oregon used to look like your typical suburb. Lots of lawns and lots of parking. When Portland’s MAX light-rail line expanded to Gresham, developers saw an opportunity to bring something different: walkable development. But a downturn in the local real estate market interceded. One developer trying to build a four-story condo project decided that […]

Let’s Chop Up Superblocks

|
Forest City’s Atlantic Yards project would create two massive superblocks in Prospect Hts., Brooklyn Portland, Oregon, which has ascended the ranks of cities judged most walkable, bikable, and urbane, benefits mightily from its small 200-foot square blocks, which provide businesses more street frontage and people more streets on which to bike, cycle and walk. These […]