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Bill Clinton’s Reading List: Richard Heinberg

party__s_over.jpgThis week's New Yorker has a lengthy profile of Bill Clinton by David Remnick. The article is not available online but this Q&A with Remnick is. Check out what Clinton was reading around the time of the World Cup this summer:

[Clinton's] taste in fiction, although I don't think it's limited to this, seems to be of a lower brow: he loves thrillers and police novels and stuff like that. I borrowed a book from him that he had just read, "TheParty's Over: Oil, War, and the Fate of Industrial Societies," by Richard Heinberg, not exactly summer reading, and it was full of underlinings and what looked like the most serious undergraduate's markings, with lots of exclamation points.

What do you want to bet that neither this book nor Heinberg's two most recent ones, Power Down and The Oil Depletion Protocol have made it onto George W. Bush's reading list yet?

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