Where to Park a Vespa in NYC?

Parked_Vespa.jpg

While the city is awash in places to park cars on the street and there is some provision for cyclists to park on sidewalks in some places, deciding where to park a Vespa is a difficult choice. Leave it on the street (like the photo above) where some automobile driver will inevitably hit it while trying to parallel park, or park it on the sidewalk where it might get a ticket since it’s technically illegal (like the one below). And the city is starting to crack down on sidewalk parking.

vespa_parked_2.jpg

Note how little space the scooters take up on both the street and the sidewalk. Now, what if there was dedicated parking for scooters and other motorcycles. What would that look like? It might look like this well-organized street in downtown San Francisco:

scooter_parking_SF.JPG

Photo Credits: DcolLisa Whiteman, myself

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