Today’s Headlines

  • Driver Kills Basid Miah, 23, on Conduit Boulevard in East New York, No Charges Expected (News)
  • Speeding Drunk Driver Causes Five-Car Crash on Bronx Park East, Killing Shiquan Dunn, 31 (News)
  • The Times Is Appalled Cuomo and de Blasio Haven’t United to Fix the Subways
  • Greg David: NYC Business Leaders Don’t Care About the Transit System Like They Used To (Crain’s)
  • No Time Like the L Train Shutdown to Make the Union Square Subway Station Fully Accessible (Crain’s)
  • What Happens When Station Agents Leave Their Booths and Work Amongst the Riders? (NYT)
  • 14 Black Pastors Urge Cuomo to Equalize Fees on Uber and Yellow Taxis (News)
  • Daily News Wants Your Stories of Terrible Transit and Gridlocked Streets
  • The Video of This Group Bike Ride Doesn’t Jibe With the “Cycling Mob” Headlines (NBC, News)
  • Parents at PS172 Say the Speedway Gas Station in Sunset Park Is a Deathtrap (Bklyn Paper)
  • Send a Message That Cops Aren’t Above the Law — End Placard Abuse (Slate)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • Larry Littlefield

    I’m not a Municipal Art Society public facilities snob. I though LaGuardia was OK the way it was, since how much time does one actually spend there?

    But the Albany and Schenectady bus stations are revolting. I guess I’ll make sure to plan ahead and get train tickets. The Schenectady Amtrak station is now a temporary trailer, but better that than what they have up the street.

    Speaking of Amtrak, it’s pretty annoying to hear The Donald decrying yet another wreck with people killed rather than celebrating it. If you keep trying to screw something up and kill it off, you shouldn’t be allowed to pretend to be upset by the consequences.

    I expect we’ll soon have some similar expressions of regret and concern from Cuomo, DeBlasio and the state legislature after some subway horror kills a bunch of serfs, as I predicted here, and it infuriates me in advance.

    https://larrylittlefield.wordpress.com/2016/01/02/the-nyc-subway-squeezing-the-serfs/

  • AstoriaBlowin

    This is the best part of the cycling “mob” story,

    “At one point, a driver who had been assaulted by a bicyclist made a U-turn against the flow of traffic in an attempt to chase down the group. That’s when he or she hit an NYPD officer, injuring the officer’s leg and hand, law enforcement sources said. That person wasn’t expected to face charges because it appeared to be an accident, according to the sources.”

    So the driver tries to at the least intimidate and maybe assault the group of cyclists with his car but injures someone else in the process and it’s an accident with no charges? But the cyclists will be charged with reckless endangerment if they are caught, what a city.

  • Larry Littlefield

    I saw a news report on the mob. It showed kids riding on the Cross Bronx Expressway, which was wrong. And which also didn’t happen this time.

  • 1ifbyrain2ifbytrain

    At least the bus station in Albany allows passengers to disembark in downtown Albany and not have to take a “taxi”. Amtrak is simply too expensive and too unreliable compared to buses for most any trip between DC and Boston.

  • dave “paco” abraham

    What the hell? Even Basid’s own family blames their son, the victim. “The family suspects that Miah was listening to music and not paying attention when he stepped across the boulevard in the predawn darkness.” They have the “utmost respect” for the driver!? Why not have utmost contempt for DOT for allowing the Conduit to remain a dangerous highway that cuts through residential neighborhoods, with only these laughable pseduo crosswalks at Grant Ave. Cars zoom 40, 50, 60mph along the Conduit… especially at unsignalized sections like this. If ever a Queens street was in need of robust #VisionZero redesigns, it’s the Conduit. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/0306b2235ff0413c31d94280c08c2eaa564a3c77f920b4baad1ffd810c09ea8d.png

  • Ken Dodd

    Apparently illegal u-turns are another of those potentially deadly road crimes the NYPD turns a blind eye to, presumably because to prosecute them would be hypocritical given the way they themselves drive when off duty. I recall a few years ago when a livery cab driver did an illegal u-turn in the Bronx (or Brooklyn), lost control and plowed into a bus stop full of people. I think someone may have died and another lost a leg or something. And no charges were filed.

  • Ken Dodd

    “The Video of This Group Bike Ride Doesn’t Jibe With the “Cycling Mob” Headlines” — are we sure about that given their attacks on cars and assault on a man? I’ve seen these groups of kids riding in large groups against traffic up busy avenues, playing chicken with other road users and threatening people (happened to me on 5th last year, and I’m not sure it’s the kind of behavior we want to sugar coat or relate to as cyclists in any way.

  • sbauman

    The 2016 Hub Bound Travel Data is now available on NYMTC’s website.

    https://www.nymtc.org/Data-and-Modeling/Transportation-Data-and-Statistics/Publications/Hub-Bound-Travel

    It shows the continuation of several trends.

    1. The number of vehicles entering the CBD continued to decline. The number is now 709K, down from 724K in 2015. This continues a long term trend that started around 2000. This year’s 709K incoming vehicle count is the lowest since the early 1980’s, assuming the October 2001 count was an outlier (immediately post 9/11).

    2. The daily total percentage of public transit riders into the CBD during the 8-9 and 7-10 peak hours remained at 19% and 43%, respectively. This has been trending downward since the mid 1980’s, when these figures were 31% and 60%.

    3. The number of people using the subway declined. The 24 hour total declined from 114.0% of the 1963 total to 112.7%. The declines for the 8-9 and 7-10 peak hours were: 64.2 to 64.0% and 76.7 to 76.1%. Each of these declines was on the order of 1%. Contrary to the MTA’s analysis, the decline showed no temporal distinction on a percentage basis. This confirms the data that I mentioned in item 2.

    4. Inbound bicycle counts increased from 29K to 32K for a 10% increase. The inbound bicycle count on the Williamsburg Bridge exceeded 20% of the incoming vehicles from 8 to 10 am and over 7% for 24 hours.

  • AMH

    The only explanation I can come up with is Stockholm Syndrome. A woman I know was hit my a truck while she was standing on the sidewalk, yet she often makes observations about careless pedestrians, and only notices insane driving behavior and awful pedestrian conditions when I point them out. My dad is a cyclist and has been hit through no fault of his own, but can still come across as tone-deaf on that very issue. I think that for a certain generation, the windshield perspective is so ingrained that even a major trauma like this doesn’t change it.

  • AMH

    I know! My reaction exactly.

    I was riding down Columbus Av on Saturday, and I encountered possibly the same “mob” near Lincoln Center. Some were wearing face masks but they were quite friendly to fellow cyclists. Their numbers definitely calmed traffic, which made me feel a lot safer. I can imagine that there could have been a few bad apples in the group (one vandal doesn’t make everyone else a mob), or that things took a turn when a driver acted aggressively. The way the press and NYPD assign blame (and who deserves to use the street) is absolutely disgusting.

  • AstoriaBlowin

    Issue is that the two reports aren’t aligned, the Daily News says the cyclists retaliated against a driver who hit one of them in their story, no mention of that in the NBC one. Attacking someone or breaking windows is generally not ok but whether the car hit a cyclist is a relevant part of the story that changes how the story should be reported if true.

  • Larry Littlefield

    So, to what extent does the proposed state budget allow the MTA to jack up property taxes on the suburbs? Or is it just New York City?

  • AMH

    Love this video of an artist filling potholes with plants. While I don’t share his confidence in drivers’ ability to not hit things, it really illustrates how a little greenery can improve the street, while eliciting a comically tone-deaf response from DOT (do drivers not already swerve to miss potholes?)

    https://nypost.com/2018/02/02/prankster-plants-trees-in-nyc-potholes/

  • Ken Dodd

    Not every group of teen cyclists are the same. There really are some who behave atrociously. Some of them come out specifically to pull those ‘near miss’ wheelies in front of vehicles, and make a point of riding up busy avenues against the flow of traffic.

  • Vooch

    Streets are for children and other humans

  • Vooch

    you seem to believe streets are for the exclusive use of hulking death machines – wrong

  • Ken Dodd

    I’m not saying that at all and you know I’m not. I’ve seen these “flash mobs” of kids riding in tandem the wrong way up avenues, pulling stupid stunts in front of cars and playing chicken with motorists and other cyclists. Ignoring this and trying to turn it into a “bikes have every right to be on the road” issue is just intellectually dishonest.

  • Maggie

    That is awesome data.

    What do you think is behind the low ridership for buses crossing 60th Street? Is it basically a “subways are better” phenomenon? I’m shocked the bus ridership numbers aren’t higher.

    E.g., daily bus ridership from north of 60th fell 4.5% a year over 2010-2016, to 64K, while bike commuting rose 4.7% a year to 64K (including those who bike from BK and Queens).

    I’m curious for the 2010 baseline number for cyclists crossing 60th Street but didn’t see it there.

  • sbauman

    That is awesome data.

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions,” Grace Hopper. The annual Hub Bound Report has provided data for over 40 years. Anyone can download it. I wish it did not take a year to compile it.

    I’m curious for the 2010 baseline number for cyclists crossing 60th Street but didn’t see it there.

    It’s present in the 2010 report. Download it from the same site. It’s 15,053 inbound and 15,379 outbound.

    Thanks for noting the continued decline of local buses across the 60th St cordon. The 2016 data shows 19,964 inbound bikes and 21,229 inbound local bus passengers. The 2017 data will probably see those numbers reversed.

  • Vooch

    anywhere there are humans – cars should be moving at under 15 MPH for safety.

    These children are merely reminding boorish and reckless drivers to be safe and courteous.

    Streets are for people
    Streets are for children to play in

  • Andrew

    This is actually a signalized intersection. It doesn’t, however, appear that anybody was in the slightest bit interested in determining whether the driver had the green light. It also doesn’t appear that anybody was interested in determining whether the driver was driving in excess of the 30 mph speed limit, or whether the driver was exercising due care to avoid colliding with a pedestrian. It’s so much easier to assume that the pedestrian, who is now dead, was suicidal.

    Also, this is Brooklyn (but only a few blocks from the Queens line).

    Would you believe that there’s a subway station a block and a half away? In other words, a lot of pedestrians need to cross the street here to reach the subway, and this is what they have to put up with every day.

  • Andrew

    Not better – just much, much, much faster.

  • Flakker

    LIRR stops don’t raise value for surrounding areas because the LIRR is almost worthless as transit in most locations and the value is artificially retarded by zoning and permitting rules, hence it’s immune to value-capture schemes. It just has to keep being subsidized forever

  • Ken Dodd

    No they’re not, they’re being boorish and reckless themselves. And I’d say that even if the Avenues they were cycling the wrong way up were completely free of cars and bicycle/pedestrian only.

  • You both have good points, and are talking past one another to a degree.

    From the standpoint of policy, streets of a city should be primarily for pedestrians and bicyclists. To the extent that use by motor vehicles is tolerated, it should be only such use that does not interfere terribly with use by the streets’ primary users. So, for example, a speed limit of 15 or 20 miles per hour is appropriate; and curbside parking should not be allowed.

    But groups of bicyclists riding the wrong way and playing chicken is not the kind of use that is envisioned by those who want to ensure that streets serve the interests of pedestrians and bicyclists.

    Maybe in the far future, when we have gotten the personal automobile out of our cities, we’ll be able to tolerate a little “kids-will-be-kids” indulgence. But, as of right now, while we’re still fighting a toxic orthodoxy which considers car usage a right and which blithely overlooks all the resultant harm, we should be clear that behaviour such as that which is being attributed to these young bicyclists is not what we want to defend or promote.

  • Vooch

    how can children playing be ‘going the wrong way’ ?

  • Vooch

    it’s children who have every right to play on city streets.

  • Ken Dodd

    Great, well good luck with that. LOL.

  • Ken Dodd

    Because riding into oncoming traffic is clearly dangerous.

  • Ken Dodd

    This is what I’m saying though. Even if the road was 100% for cyclists, there’s still such a thing as reckless behavior, and what these kids do would continue to fit that description.

  • Vooch

    you mean because drivers are operating their hulking death machine recklessly ?

  • Ken Dodd

    Whatevs lol