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Federal Highway Administration

Tell FHWA You Want Safer Designs for City Streets

3:46 PM EST on November 17, 2015

Earlier this fall, the Federal Highway Administration proposed a major policy change: Instead of requiring roads that receive federal funding to be designed like highways, the agency would change its standards to allow greater flexibility. The implications for urban streets were huge -- with less red tape, cities would have a much easier time implementing safer designs for walking and biking. Now FHWA is accepting public comment on this proposal, and you can help ensure that it's enacted.

Applying highway design standards like wide lane widths and "clear zones" to city streets encourages speeding and recklessness, increasing the risk of walking and biking especially. FHWA's October rule change proposal acknowledged those dangers, saying that scholarly research doesn't support 11 of the 13 standards the agency had imposed on roads intended for speeds less than 50 mph.

Many urban streets would be affected by updating the FHWA rules. Freed from outdated design standards, cities will be able to change their streets much more quickly.

But the change isn't official yet. The public comment period -- part of the process of changing federal rules -- is happening now Stephen Lee Davis at Transportation for America says its critical that FHWA hear from people who support this change. Unlike other types of public comment periods -- environmental reviews of highway projects, for example -- these rulemaking comments are taken seriously, says Davis.

Transportation for America has created a tool to help people send their thoughts to the right people.

"For the cities out there leading the way on building smarter, safer, complete, walkable streets that are also magnets for productive economic growth, this is a really encouraging move that will make their work easier," he said. "We hope others will support FHWA's proposal."

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