Today’s Headlines

  • Thanks Cuomo: MTA Board Approves Truncated Capital Plan, Funding Source TBD (Politico, NYT)
  • Program Guts Phase Two of Second Avenue Subway Construction (WNYC, 2AS, AMNY)
  • Plan Allocates Funding for North Shore BRT Design Work (Advance)
  • New York and New Jersey Legislators Out of Sync on Port Authority Reform (Politico)
  • RPA Produced a Nifty Video on How Devastating It Will Be If Hudson River Tubes Fail
  • East New York Residents Fear de Blasio Rezoning Will Force People Out (Politico)
  • Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce Bemoans Lack of Gas Stations and Big Box Retail (Crain’s)
  • Drunk On-Duty Access-A-Ride Driver Crashes Into Parked Car in Graniteville (Advance)
  • Hit-and-Run Motorist Injures Off-Duty Cop in Middle Village (NewsPost)
  • UES “Safety Advocate” Says Spoiled Brat Cyclists Don’t Deserve Crosstown Bike Lanes (NY Press)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • AnoNYC

    Cutting funding for phase 2 of the SAS: Stupid, stupid, stupid.

    The Lexington Ave line is already above capacity for a large portion of the day, East Harlem and the Bronx have far more dense zoning rules than say Utica Ave, less NIMBYism towards such development, and expect substantial new construction in the coming years (in already dense areas).

    So shortsighted, this is unacceptable. We need the entire SAS completed YESTERDAY.

  • BBnet3000

    To be fair they are allocating $535 million to Phase II, which would be enough to finish it in most other cities. This could be an opportunity for the MTA (but they will let this crisis go to waste).

  • Joe R.

    What’s bothering me here is the feds are only kicking in $6 billion. NYS sends something like $94 billion more to Washington then it gets back in spending ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_taxation_and_spending_by_state ). Sounds like they owe us another $88 billion per year. That would be enough to build subways all over the place, even at current inflated construction rates.

  • Tyler

    “The officer had the walk signal prior to crossing, according to authorities.”

    Hmm. Interesting. How exactly do the “authorities” know this? And why are they looking for the driver… The pedestrian was *barely* injured. And where is the “No criminality suspected” default position? I’m sure the driver didn’t even realize he hit a pedestrian. And if he knew, I’m sure he’d be really really sorry.

    Oh wait… Is it because the pedestrian was a cop?

  • Fool

    Opportunity for what? Remove union requirement to force competitive change in union contract? That is the elephant in the room that no one wants to tackle, so just raise more revenue…

  • bolwerk

    Cuomo is willing to offer New Jersey a $5 billion subsidy for a trans-Hudson tunnel, and the city gets the single most important transit program in the country cut. Not a single elected official is paying attention to that fact.

    North Shore BRT is a boneheaded idea too. The the BRT should probably be on the West Shore, where they’re pushing LRT, and the North Shore should have LRT, preferably connected to HBLR if this route is taken, or heavy rail.

  • com63

    They usually look for hit and run drivers. It would be interesting to see what would have happened had the driver remained at the scene and said that they didn’t see the pedestrian.

  • Matthias

    Exactly. Also, if the officer had the walk signal, the motorist likely had a green light, thus clearing him/her of all blame, by NYPD logic.

  • Matthias

    Yes yes yes. And it should be going to the Bronx, which will improve access and relieve congestion even more. I often can’t even get on the Lex express during rush hour at 125th unless there are delays on the 6 which otherwise dumps out 1000 riders every 2-3 minutes, most of whom want to cram onto already-full express trains. If you’re going to cut anything, cut the money pit that is ESA.

  • Kevin Love

    Remember, a car driver who gives cops such minor injuries that they are promptly released from hospital gets charged with Attempted Murder.

    http://nypost.com/2012/08/22/driver-held-in-cop-hit/

  • AnoNYC

    I would like to see the SAS eventually run along the former Third Ave elevated route in the Bronx. There is enormous opportunity for ridership along that corridor, now and potentially. In fact, thousands of units of dense, transit oriented housing could rise (and are). While Brooklyn NIMBYs cry over 4 story buildings (the Utica Ave corridor is significantly less dense), every building going up along this corridor in the Bronx as of late is over 6 stories with existing zoning (many of which are 8+ stories).

  • Matthias

    I was wondering why we would spend money on converting a perfectly good railroad ROW that connects to existing yards and shops to a roadway for buses which would then have to be converted back if ridership outgrew buses. I have no idea how the costs compare, but it seems pretty stupid when you could just run trains.

  • sbauman

    “The Lexington Ave line is already above capacity for a large portion of the day,”

    They currently operate 27 expresses and 22 locals between 8 and 9am. If trains are crowded at other times, it’s a management not a capacity deficiency. They used to operate 32 expresses and 30 locals during the peak hour.

    “East Harlem and the Bronx have far more dense zoning rules than say Utica Ave,”

    The number of people living within 1/2 mile of the closest subway station. Crown Heights/Utica Ave – 31,401; 125th St/Lex – 16,703; 138th St/Grand Concourse – 2899. The number of people living within 1 mile of the closest station. Crown Heights/Utica Ave – 33,780; 125th St/Lex – 18,864; 138th St/Grand Concourse – 2,899.

    There is very little basis for the SAS, based on the service it is duplicating. It’s a priority, only because of the City’s inability to build it.

  • BBnet3000

    In most (all?) cases where a disused ROW is reused for light rail they completely replace the rail and railbed.

  • Andrew

    The idea is to through-route buses from various parts of Staten Island onto the busway, where they’d continue to St. George. Running a train would require an extra transfer of most riders.

    I doubt ridership will ever come close to outgrowing buses.

  • Andrew

    They currently operate 27 expresses and 22 locals between 8 and 9am. If trains are crowded at other times, it’s a management not a capacity deficiency. They used to operate 32 expresses and 30 locals during the peak hour.

    Used to operate? Or used to schedule?

    The number of people living within 1/2 mile of the closest subway station. Crown Heights/Utica Ave – 31,401; 125th St/Lex – 16,703; 138th St/Grand Concourse – 2899. The number of people living within 1 mile of the closest station. Crown Heights/Utica Ave – 33,780; 125th St/Lex – 18,864; 138th St/Grand Concourse – 2,899.

    Great news! Nobody’s proposing to close the Utica Avenue station. The question is whether it makes sense to prioritize a new subway line along Utica Avenue south of Eastern Parkway over phase 2 of the Second Avenue Subway.

  • sbauman

    “Used to operate? Or used to schedule?”

    I did not count the trains, when I rode the Lex in 1954. It appeared to operate on much shorter headways than they do today. The BOT’s 1949 report has a similar chart with 30 tph on both the local and express. They also reported that the IRT’S on time performance was 87.47%. It’s a fair supposition that the BOT operated pretty much what they promised. BTW, the BOT reported that the BMT and IND on time performance was in excess of 99%. All this without CBTC and with greater passenger loads.

    “The question is whether it makes sense to prioritize a new subway line along Utica Avenue south of Eastern Parkway over phase 2 of the Second Avenue Subway.”

    The SAS duplicates existing service by which I mean the residents are already within 0.5 miles of an existing station entrance. That should not be surprising because 97.4% of Manhattan residents live within 0.5 miles of a subway entrance.

    I believe the priority should be to expand the subway to areas that are not presently served i.e. more than 0.5 miles from a subway entrance. The Utica Avenue corridor, south of Empire Blv, is one such area. It would not have been my first priority. However, it’s a step towards actually expanding the subway’s territory.

  • Matthias

    Interesting numbers. Any idea what counted as on-time back then? Anecdotally, both locals and expresses are on very short headways (90-120 seconds) during rush hour, but they also move more slowly during that time. Outside of rush hour, they run faster but headways are too long.

  • AnoNYC

    I agree that there should be more trains (shorter headways), however my focus are densely populated undeserved areaas along Third Ave.

    The Third Ave corridor in the Bronx is far more dense than Utica Ave this is where the SAS should expand to (to replace the Third Ave elevated). Additionally, the neighborhood around E 138th and Grand Concourse is a manufacturing district which was recently zoned far more dense than Utica. You chose the most empty immediate station.

  • AnoNYC

    Third Ave corridor > Utica Ave corridor. This is the most ripe area for new construction without immidiate subway access and already dense. This is why phase 2 is vital, for an eventual connection to the Bronx. There is potential for thousands of units in an already transit oriented, mixed use area.

  • sbauman

    The area along the Third Ave corridor that is more than 0.5 miles from a subway station is only 0.5 miles wide. It means most of the old Third Ave El stops are fairly close to either the Concourse or 2, 5 or 6 stops.

    Here’s a list of the old Third Ave El stops and their distance to the closest existing stop:
    138th St – Third Ave (6)
    143rd St – 1556 ft from Third Ave (6)
    149th St – Third Ave (2,5)
    156th St – 1940 ft from Third Ave (2,5)
    161st St – 2414 ft from Prospect Ave (2,5)
    166th St – 3797 ft from 167th St (D)
    169th St – 3799 ft from Freeman St (2,5)
    Claremont Pkwy – 3410 ft from 170th St (D)
    174th St – 3456 ft from 174th St (2,5)
    Tremont Ave – 2884 ft from Tremont Ave (D)
    180th St – 2691 ft from 182nd-183rd St (D)
    183rd St – 2815 ft from 182nd-183rd St (D)
    Fordham Rd – 1853 ft from Fordham Rd (D)
    Bedford Pk Blv – 2106 ft from Bedford Pk Blv (D)
    204th St – 1456 ft from 205th St (D)
    210th St – 1505 ft from Gun Hill Rd (2,5)
    Gun Hill Rd – Gun Hill Rd (2,5)

    By contrast Utica Ave is a full mile from the Nostrand Ave line on the west and 1.5 mile from the Canarsie line on the east. The Canarsie line ends at Clarendon Rd, meaning there is nothing to the east. The Nostrand Ave line ends at Ave H, making Utica Ave 1.75 miles from the Brighton line. Utica Ave extends all the way to Flatbush Ave, a distance of 3.86 miles.

  • AnoNYC

    That small area has greater potential for much more dense development than Utica Ave (potentially significantly more units). We’re talking about multiple large NYCHA properties with available land, vacant lots, parking lots, and one story commercial/manufacturing. Most importantly, the area could be upzoned to what it once was (solid rows of 5-6 story apartment buildings) or greater. Already most new apartment buildings are substantially larger than existing pre-wars. The Third Ave corridor is much more receptive to increased density than the Utica Ave politically. The neighborhood is also closer to Midtown (the largest centralized job core) and is more mass transportation dependent.

    The Grand Concourse is also uphill, so much so that it requires stair streets north of E 161st St. The 2/5 are also uphill, although less aggressively, to the east. The 2/5 also travel far from the Third Ave corridor beginning around the Cross Bronx Expressway.

    Resorting the Third Ave corridor would highly benefit the city.

  • sbauman

    The SAS phase 1 will provide 20,000 more people with 0.5 mile distance to a subway station. The SAS phase 2 will provide 2.7K more people the same subway access. Rebuilding the Third Ave El from 133rd St to Gun Hill Rd will provide 60K more people with 0.5 mile access to a subway station. Building the Utica Ave subway from Empire Blv to Avenue U will provide 84K more people with 0.5 mile access to a subway station.

  • AnoNYC

    Currently.

    However, with redevelopment, an expansion of the SAS to Gun Hill Rd could service substantially more ridership. It’s much more politically feasible to upzone and build Washington Heights/Grand Concourse density along Third Ave than it is in South Brooklyn along Utica Ave. East Harlem also contains substantial potential for increased density (especially within NYCHA property).