Today’s Headlines

  • Harlem CBs and Elected Officials Share Credit For Derailing SBS (Observer, 2nd Avenue Sagas)
  • WSJ Pinpoints CB 11’s Decision to Hold SBS Hostage to Moving Unrelated Bus Stop
  • Quinn: Cycling Helped Me Lose Weight and Stress — On a Stationary Bike (Post)
  • Times Imagines the Future of Costly WTC PATH Hub; Cuozzo Is Not Impressed (Post)
  • Peter King and “Law-Enforcement Source” Boost Ray Kelly DHS Bid (News, Post)
  • Vallone Wants Hearings on Cuts to MTA Bridge and Tunnel Patrols (Post)
  • Reports From the Citi Bike Gripe Session That Wasn’t (Bowery Boogie, Lo-Down)
  • MTA to Move Around Ticket Machines in Busy Stations to Help Pedestrian Flow (News)
  • This May Be the Most Rambling, Incomprehensible Citi Bike Screed Ever (Downtown Express)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Larry Littlefield

    Good to see the Council Speaker getting back in shape. But what I found out in my 30s was that for most responsible adults, taking extra time to get exercise for the sake of exercise is not sustainable. There is no time.

    And since we don’t really use our bodies at work or at home anymore, thanks to all the equipment we have, getting to and from work is the only chance.

  • You know how people have been saying for decades that Americans work too much, especially compared to other first-world nations where they work full workweeks but not for the total and continuous hours that we do as a regular pattern?

    Ahem.

    Fifteen minutes a day for exercise is all you need. If your job isn’t even flexible for that, they need to respect your boundaries better. (and you ought to be clear about that with them!)

    Really, even an extra fifteen minutes a day just so you can cook your own meals, not even exercise, would result in a vast health improvement for many individuals. And it’s sad that we so easily cough that up in order to work in the modern workplace, where there isn’t a future anyway.

  • Bolwerk

    It very much hurts me to concur with Cuozzo, but I do. Just think what “$3.44 billion (and counting)” could have done: probably another SAS phase. PATH could have probably been extended at least to Brooklyn, certainly to Newark Airport. Maybe even something really creative like tying PATH into the LIRR Atlantic Avenue, and bringing it to Jamaica. All the WTC needed was a platform, not a fancy terminal. A second station elsewhere in Lower Manhattan, if feasible, could have cut crowding at the WTC station.

    Peter King never saw a constitutional right he didn’t want to violate. Fitting that he’d back Kelly.

  • carma

    im in my mid 30s and in great shape. but a few days ago a co-worker asked, did you lose even more weight?

    i said maybe. my lifestyle didnt change. i still regularly exercise, eat right, have an occasional beer or two (or three).

    the only difference is that ive been riding citibikes for about 4 miles every weekday.

    i figure im burning maybe an extra 100 calories a day for a guy who weighs 151lbs. imagine an average american weighing 50lbs more and riding that equivalent commute to work?

    hello the cure to obesity/diabetes/heart disease. get on your bicycles!

  • carma

    its hard to muster an extra 15 minutes for folks who have kids and juggle the work / life balance..

    but i do agree on cooking your own meals to maintain a healthier lifestyle.

  • Bolwerk

    Don’t really disagree, but not many things cook in 15m. A lot of the time we spend commuting, either by car or transit, is theft of our time to prepare our meals, let alone exercise. It’s why I’m really rather sympathetic to people who eat on the subway, even if it’s a kind of unpleasant habit.

  • I mean, if you have kids and you don’t have time to have at least one parent handle any cooking (particularly breakfast) – that’s ridiculous.

    A London Broil cooks in 14 minutes. A roaster chicken, separated into parts onto a sheet pan & seasoned, roasts for 20 minutes after 5 minutes prep. A salad takes all of 5 minutes to prepare, particularly if you’re adding chicken protein from the leftovers of the roaster chicken above. A soup or stew made from dry goods should take no more than 10 minutes setup and then 30-60 minutes of waiting for it to finish. I have a broiled frozen salmon recipe (yes, frozen! Why waste time defrosting?) that’s ready-to-eat 20 minutes out of the freezer, and a baked meatball recipe (for 2lbs worth) that’s start-to-finish almost as soon. Put a crock pot/slow cooker into the mix (which can cook a whole range of things with 5 minutes prep and 8 hours of unattended braising) and you’ve got the ability to cook such a wide range of simple, nearly attention-less recipes that it makes almost no sense to ever order out again.

    That’s not to demonize ordering-out entirely, but if you have 5 minutes to wait for a fast food meal (which is about average), then carving an extra 15m out of your day to get better food – without long-term preservatives, weird additives, cups full of sugar, salt and grease – makes a lot of sense, and is worth whatever blowback you’ll get from your boss. Doesn’t the stock market close at 4pm anyway? Can’t almost anything in the modern workplace (particularly the organizational stuff) essentially be done after 8pm on a home laptop now? Why be in the office after that time at all?

    (oh, also, if you’re an avid cyclist like so many of us, you really don’t want to be getting by on Subway and McDonalds.)

  • Larry Littlefield

    “Fifteen minutes a day for exercise is all you need.”

    Plus the time needed to convince yourself needed to do exercise of the sake of exercise and prepare, and cooling off, showering, changing afterward. When I was younger I would go jogging for 20 minutes. It took an hour. Once we had babies I didn’t have the hour, or the 20 minutes.

  • Anonymous

    Or put another way, we could’ve funded 500 years of bikeshare for what’s being poured into one PATH station at WTC. Or 100 years of a system 5x the size.

  • carma

    i do make my own meals everyday. going out to eat to us is considered recreation. in fact, most of my full course dinners are cooked in 11 minutes or less. i have everything marinated and set to fry/grill/steam, etc… ready before i come home from work. the problem is cleaning and serving which takes an additonal x amount of minutes.

    im pretty efficient in balancing time. but it is a challenge to most.

    getting 15 minutes to exercise really is tough for most. it will require a lifestyle change. partially why i do encourage most to try out biking to work as part of your routine. you dont lose ANY time at all idling away since you are exercising and getting to your destination.

  • Reader

    Or a Dutch-style sea wall to protect lower Manhattan from flooding during the next super storm.

  • Anonymous

    Hmm. If Congress’s one and only honest-to-goodness terrorist, Peter King, wants Ray Kelly as head of DHS, well, make your own conclusions.

  • Bolwerk

    I always forget that. Yes, the head of the Homeland Security Committee in the House actually had ties to a real terrorist organization.

  • krstrois

    American culture is really dysfunctional about ordinary activity. Everything is repurposed as some “hardcore” emergency and therefore nobody thinks they can or have the time to “exercise” because you need all these bells and whistles to do it. It’s bizarre. And of course there are vestiges of this in cycling advocacy, though it’s much better than it was . . .

  • krstrois

    American culture is really dysfunctional about ordinary activity. Everything is repurposed as some “hardcore” emergency and therefore nobody thinks they can or have the time to “exercise” because you need all these bells and whistles to do it. It’s bizarre. And of course there are vestiges of this in cycling advocacy, though it’s much better than it was . . .

  • Joe R.

    People have to think of getting exercise the same way as they’re told to think of saving for retirement. You don’t save for retirement only whenever you have “extra” money, meaning money left over after you pay the necessary bills and buy whatever frills you want. Rather, retirement savings becomes one of your necessary bills which you pay before you buy frills.

    We should think of exercise the same way. It should come before time for anything which is strictly unnecessary. You should reserve time to exercise along with time to take care of other bodily functions. It should come BEFORE time for work, time for caring for others, etc. Really, the only things which should take precedence over time for exercise is time for sleeping, eating, and washing. If your job demands so much time that you can’t exercise, chances are good you’re not getting enough sleep either. That means your job is slowly killing you. Get another job which respects your need for downtime more. You’re no good to anybody, including your employer, family, or yourself, if you don’t stay in shape. I’ve seen plenty of people who think they don’t have time to exercise because of job or family obligations fall apart in their 40s or 50s, to the point they could no longer care for even themselves. That’s why you need to exercise.

    I reserve at least 20 hours a month for cycling, although I feel better if I cycle 25 to 30 hours. That’s in addition to walking on average 30 minutes a day running errands. I think this is the bare minimum the human body needs to stay healthy. If you don’t have as much time during the work week, then aim for maybe 30 minutes a day exercise during workdays, and at least 2 or 3 hours on each day you’re off. If possible, try to shift to 4 longer workdays so you have more days off. Given the sedentary jobs most people have, you *need* at least this much exercise to keep from gaining weight. Starvation diets don’t work because an average person only feels satiated eating 3000 to 4000 calories daily. I credit cycling with at least keeping my weight in check, although I’m still a bit overweight (5’9″, 190-200 pounds). Now I’ve finally managed to cut most of the junk food out of my diet. With ~3000 calories a day, plus cycling, I should hopefully get down to what I should weigh (~125 pounds) within 2 years.

    It should also bear mentioning that many people work much more than 40 hours and claim to have no time simply to buy a bunch of things they don’t really need. Everyone should evaluate their lifestyle and see what can be cut. Often, they may find they can drastically reduce their work hours, or even work part-time, if they do this.

  • Joe R.

    The key to finding time is to evaluate things. I see many people who have work, friends, clubs, etc. all competing for their limited time. I learned a long time ago that at some point you just have to tell people “no”, and stick to it. You need to take care of yourself and your immediate family, but beyond that you have no obligations to anyone. If you can find time for others after taking care of necessary things like keeping yourself in shape, then fine. If not, then you don’t. Personally, I wouldn’t want to have nearly every minute of my day programmed with appointments, duties, and obligations. People need downtime, and lots of it, to be happy.

  • Joe R.

    The key to finding time is to evaluate things. I see many people who have work, friends, clubs, etc. all competing for their limited time. I learned a long time ago that at some point you just have to tell people “no”, and stick to it. You need to take care of yourself and your immediate family, but beyond that you have no obligations to anyone. If you can find time for others after taking care of necessary things like keeping yourself in shape, then fine. If not, then you don’t. Personally, I wouldn’t want to have nearly every minute of my day programmed with appointments, duties, and obligations. People need downtime, and lots of it, to be happy.

  • Joe R.

    The key to finding time is to evaluate things. I see many people who have work, friends, clubs, etc. all competing for their limited time. I learned a long time ago that at some point you just have to tell people “no”, and stick to it. You need to take care of yourself and your immediate family, but beyond that you have no obligations to anyone. If you can find time for others after taking care of necessary things like keeping yourself in shape, then fine. If not, then you don’t. Personally, I wouldn’t want to have nearly every minute of my day programmed with appointments, duties, and obligations. People need downtime, and lots of it, to be happy.

  • Joe R.

    The key to finding time is to evaluate things. I see many people who have work, friends, clubs, etc. all competing for their limited time. I learned a long time ago that at some point you just have to tell people “no”, and stick to it. You need to take care of yourself and your immediate family, but beyond that you have no obligations to anyone. If you can find time for others after taking care of necessary things like keeping yourself in shape, then fine. If not, then you don’t. Personally, I wouldn’t want to have nearly every minute of my day programmed with appointments, duties, and obligations. People need downtime, and lots of it, to be happy.

  • Joe R.

    “You know how people have been saying for decades that Americans work too much, especially compared to other first-world nations where they work full workweeks but not for the total and continuous hours that we do as a regular pattern?”

    Amen to that. The US is the only first world nation which doesn’t require employers to give paid vacation time. Many other countries require at least 2 weeks, and quite a few require 4, 5, or 6 weeks. I personally feel we would be a lot healthier as a nation if we moved from a 5-day work week to a 3-day work week consisting of longer days. That’s in addition to at least 5 weeks of vacation. It’s been proven that people with less time off are far less productive. In fact, I could make a good argument for a 3-day, 24 hour work week. Most people would probably do about the same amount of work they do in 5 days and 40 hours. For some perverse reason, employers seem to think they’re getting more out of their employees if the employees are physically in the building for more hours.

  • Joe R.

    Some people cook their meals for the entire week on Saturday or Sunday, then just reheat them during the work week. It actually doesn’t take that much more time to cook 20 meals than it does to cook 3.

  • Ian Turner

    I’ll just note that although the US has no mandatory leave, it is only in 9th place in terms of longest work hours , and many of the countries higher than us are also healthier.

  • Daphna

    The thermoplast is down for the protected bike lane on Columbus from 96th to 110th. The preliminary markings for the thermoplast and the thermoplast are in different places. So either the person doing the preliminary marks made an error, or the person laying the thermoplast made an error. I have never seen it where so many of the preliminary marks and the actual thermoplast diverge. Also, there are no markings for islands, either concrete or painted tan. It looks like parking is going to go quite close to the crosswalks instead. I hope I am mis-reading the thermoplast. I thought this stretch was supposed to have concrete islands in the normal fashion of a protected bike lane design. Does anyone know?

  • Daphna

    Both the Bowery Boogie and Lo-Down articles about the Manhattan Community Board 3 hearing about bikeshare docking station locations were excellent news. Additionally, the comments sections about both articles show support. It is interesting that one primary complaint was about a station in CB2 that should not have come up in a CB3 discussion. Also, it was nice to read that after the docking station at Henry St/Grand St was removed, community members wanted it back and worried that had been removed due to complaints/petitions from Frank’s Bike Shop supporters. But it turns out that station was removed for utility work and will be put back. It is also great to hear of a co-op, the East River Housing Association, going on record wanting more docking stations in their back yard instead of suing as other co-ops have to have docking stations removed.

  • Anonymous

    find that time. Your babies need you to grow old gracefully.

  • Daphna

    The Citi bike blog has not been updated since July 8th, but when it is, yesterday will likely be another record for the number of rides taken in a day. The per dock usage is the highest ever on yesterday. Union Square, Soho, the West Village, Greenwich Village and Chelsea have overtaken Battery Park City as neighborhoods with the most activity per dock. In Brooklyn the neighborhood with the most turnover per dock is Boerum Hill which sees a lot of weekend usage. Meanwhile, all these high numbers of trips are taking place (probably 32,000 or more yesterday) with less than 4,000 citi bikes since the number of available bikes has been declining for 6 weeks since June 8th.

    So little money is needed, when compared to any other transportation option, for expansion. I wish that money could be found somewhere so bikeshare could be expanded asap to have more bikes, to have more re-balancing, to have a greater density of stations in the covered area, and to expand to many areas of NYC not presently covered by bikeshare. It would be great to have as much expansion as possible while Bloomberg, a strong supporter, is still in office.

  • Bronxite

    I could have sworn that this morning they updated it, although it wouldn’t load in my browser. I checked again and they changed the look of the system data page. Expect an update very soon.

    I have a feeling this consistent heatwave/high humidity dampened total ridership a bit in comparison to the dryer days of late June.

  • Bronxite

    I forgot to add that the DOT also recently added additional stations in Brooklyn and Queens to their bike share service map. Looks like they may attempt to complete the pre-Sandy roll out in due time.

    http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2013/07/citibike_plans.php

  • Bronxite

    Overall, citywide reception of Citi Bike has been positive. So much so that it has garnered widespread political support from Harlem to Astoria. Even Wiener rides, lol.

    I just wish that Citi Bike would establish a reasonable timeline for future phases and make it public. The Bronx could so use this.

  • Anonymous

    Integrating physical activity into your daily routine, like biking or jogging for transportation, is a great practice. But the fact is that most adults certainly do have the time to exercise as a stand-alone activity, they just aren’t motivated to do so.
    If you look at the avg. hours of TV watched, there is plenty of time for most people. If you work out on cardio machines in a gym, you can even watch TV at the same time.

  • Anonymous

    When I used to work corporate office jobs, the biggest problem with bike commuting was the lack of changing and shower facilities at the destination. Paying $50-100 per month to a gym just to use the showers seemed like a lot (midtown prices), and I couldn’t just show up sweaty and wearing shorts.

  • Ian Turner

    That’s a bit misleading, because the numbers on time spent watching TV include time doing some other activity (e.g., cooking, talking, work, etc.) while the TV is on.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Moreover, you have to go to the gym, and back. Whereas with regard to transportation, you exercise as you are going.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Back when we had an infant and a two year old, on the days I worked and my wife stayed home, I think if after arriving home — and after she had been with the infant and the two year old all day, had I said I was going out jogging and then would shower and then I would be available, she would have killed me.

  • Joe R.

    People often add the time to shower to exercise time but I think that makes no sense. I usually shower daily regardless, except maybe in the dead of winter when I might miss a day occasionally. I usually exercise right before I would be taking a shower and changing clothes anyway. For me late night works. I cycle, come home, shower, and change into my sleep wear. For those who prefer morning workouts, instead of showering before going to bed, or right after waking up, you shower after your workout, then change into your work clothes. If you plan properly, there should be no need for extra showers because of workouts.

    I think with your schedule jogging an hour or so before bedtime would have avoided conflicts with your wife. You could have watched the kids, then went out jogging after they were asleep. That said, I don’t get why many people in this country view exercise as an optional activity to the point of complaining when others do it. If I were married, I would personally be complaining if my wife *didn’t* exercise, preferably with me on my night rides.

  • Daniel

    My corporate workplace does have showers. But not nearly enough for everyone so I do without. I just take it real easy on the ride to work and do it in my work clothes. Even this week I wasn’t very sweaty, although I did wear T-Shirts. I do keep backup clothing in my filing cabinet and have a small desk, but I’ve only used the backup clothing for rain. I feel much more refreshed when I get to work and it actually saves time. I did start by bicycling on the weekends until I could go about twice the distance to work without pain the next day, and then I started by commuting by bicycle just a couple days a week then increased it to practically every day over several months.

  • Anonymous

    Seems like the data on the blog went back to an end date of 7/1/13. Weird.