Citi Bike Has Already Surpassed 10,000 Trips Per Day

Photo: ##http://peoplelookingatcitibike.tumblr.com/post/51508939915/everyone-is-looking-at-citi-bike##People Looking at Citi Bike##

Bike-share users made 10,099 trips, and annual membership continued to surge in the third full 24-hour period of usage stats that Citi Bike is reporting.

Usage between 5 p.m. Wednesday and 5 p.m. Thursday topped 10,000 trips, an increase of about 33 percent over the previous 24 hours. Meanwhile, an additional 2,449 annual subscribers joined the system — a bigger jump than the prior day — bringing the total to 23,749.

Before this Wednesday-to-Thursday period, Citi Bike ridership was already outpacing the early usage of bike-share systems in Boston and DC.

  • Joe R.

    I find temps as low as the mid 20s aren’t much of an issue if you cover your extremities. My core is never cold once I’ve been riding 10 minutes. Below mid 20s, it starts to get brutal unless you want to cover most of your face.

    I find hot, humid weather to be a bigger problem. In fact, even not so hot weather gets to be an issue if humidity is high (as it usually is in Queens). Mid 60s with high humidity can easily leave my soaked after riding 90 minutes. Once you get into the high 70s/low 80s plus humidity overheating becomes a serious concern. Without sweat evaporating, the body has no way to effectively cool itself other than the headwind generated from riding. That works marginally well until air temperature reaches skin temperature (say 80°F). The only way to avoid overheating when it’s much above 80 and humid is to just drop the pace. That’s why I consider hot weather riding a bigger problem than cold weather riding.

  • Joe R.

    Same here. That’s yet another reason I avoid stopping like the plague, especially in warmer weather.

  • Anonymous

    Agreed that they are not serious yet. The will be serious when someone gets billed a couple hundred dollars for a 48 hour rental period or $1200 for a “missing” bike and the customer has no proof that they actually returned it. The reality is that there is a lot of money at stake for these types of issues and you basically have to trust the bike docks to work reliably. If they don’t work reliably, the whole system could unravel.

  • Kingy

    Alta has had systems in multiple cities FOR SEVERAL YEARS. They should know that they are doing by now and be able to bring in experienced staff from other cities to avoid problems!

  • Daphna

    For all of Alta’s other bikeshare systems, they contracted with an external software development company. They had a billing dispute with that company and dropped them last year. NYC Bikeshare is Alta’s first bikeshare with in house software development.

  • Re: sweat. Keep a fresh shirt at your destination or bring one with you. Not as big a deal as it sounds, totally worth it.

  • If demand outstrips supply, then some of those crowded out of the Citibike program will buy their own bikes. Note to eds.: interview bike shops in a couple weeks to gauge effect of Citibike on new sales.

  • Anonymous

    The five-year sponsorship by Citibank and Mastercard works out to $9.5 million a year. Eighty-thousand annual members for 10,000 bicycles would bring in $7.6 million. About a third of London’s Cycle Hire rentals has been casual users and if its the same ratio for Citibike then user fees could rival, or exceed, sponsorship revenue.

  • Patriot

    Right on! Tell that to the post!

  • Joe R.

    I feel that way also. Besides, since this is being touted as a “green” transportation option, it’s better from a public relations standpoint not to start moving bikes by truck from one location to another to rebalance the system.

  • Anonymous

    Isn’t 80000 members extremely optimistic?

  • Greg

    So I decided to graph the blog stats for easier viewing. Check it out if interested: https://sites.google.com/site/citibikestats

  • tyler

    And most of Daphna’s comments were about making sure the bikes were distibuted properly (either in terms of the size of docking stations or “balancing”)…. The usage patterns in other cities aren’t exactly helpful here are they? The initial deployment is a best guess based on transit data and density… then it will need to be tweaked over time. FOUR days is not enough to make sure all stations are perfectly balanced.

  • Anonymous

    My brother says it took him twice as long to ride to midtown from Tribeca because he kept getting “interviewed” by curious bystanders at red lights. He says that everybody has been super-positive.

  • Daphna

    I think 80,000 annual members is easily achievable. Citibikes may even exceed that. There were already 23,749 members within the first 4 days of a preview week.

  • Anonymous

    You have to be constantly on your guard for pedestrian, cabs turning, double parked vehicles and other cyclist.

    That’s partially why I prefer bike to the train. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t want to get creamed by a truck either.

    But I’d prefer being “hyper-aware” instead of feeling helpless and without the ability to control my situation, like, when you’re taking the 4/5 and you’re stuck in traffic.

    Anyway, if you feel unsafe at times, try to plan to use certain bike lanes ahead of time. There are so many now that you can almost always gets some where via bike lanes and/or easy side streets.

    It would be no time that things get ugly if more inexperienced cyclist join the fray.

    One thing to consider is that once you have enough bikes on the road, even if they’re newbies who are clueless, the sheer volume of them causes drivers to modify their behavior. This may take a little time, but, after a while, they’ll adapt accordingly and hopefully not too many people are harmed in the interim.

  • Anonymous

    Its tough to do a apples-to-apples comparison mainly due to price differences, but Barclay’s Cycle Hire in London has worked its way up to 8,000 bicycles in two and a half years and has had 183,000 yearly members in that time frame. They are adding 2,000 more bicycles within a few months, bringing the total to 10,000 bicycles. Velib in Paris has 24,000 bicycles and 245,000 annual members. So no, 80,000 annual members is not unreasonable for 10,000 bicycles.

  • Andrew

    As a non-cyclist who is unlikely to use Citi Bike in the foreseeable future, I appreciate the reporting.

  • carma

    i went to bicycle habitat yesterday to get some riding gear. store was completely packed. i asked them if they were busy jokingly. they were just laughing.

    from what i seen, it wasnt just helmet sales. it was everything was being bought.

    theres no better time to own a bike store than now. (or phase 2 phase 3)

  • carma

    okay, i had my first bad experience today, and it was because of a “software malfunction” i locked the bike back in at 24th & bway to get a can of paint at home depot. when i came back i realized my original bike still wasnt “locked” even though it was. called customer service to be put on hold for 20 minutes. they mentioned the dreaded its a software issue, we will fix it.

    not too bad i guess. always teething pains. still loving it. but sad to say the bike next to me had a flat and was red on the dock, and the one next to that already had some graffiti.

    *sigh*

  • Eric McClure

    Or maybe it’s that the system has been live for all of five days. Chill, people.

  • Eric McClure

    I’m not at all surprised by the high frequency of inquiries and questions about Citi Bike that riders are experiencing. People on bikes in NYC look happier than people riding transit, and much, much happier than people in cars. It’s bound to be infectious.

  • Flo

    I signed up last night and i’m a couple of hundred from being the 40,000th member. I’m sure that number has been surpassed by now. What I do wonder is if they will put stations above 59th street and also over in Long island City across the 59th street bridge.. I doubt they will go above 59th street but I do hope they put some bikes in LIC.. also at how many more annual memberships will they sell before they increase the annual membership fee?

  • Anonymous

    Here’s something to think about. I rented a bike for 2 days at the day rate. My credit card was billed $110 for each day. 5 days later, my “change” was still not returned. How much money is Citibank making by holding my $90 for a week? Times several thousand, it’s alot. If they can take the money from my acct. in 30 seconds, why does it take a week to return it?

  • Ian Turner

    I can’t speak to why things are the way they are, but you can avoid this by using a credit card, instead of a debit card.

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