Odds and Ends

New York and six other cities have their federal grant application presentations online here at the Transportation Research Board. Contrary to congestion pricing opponents who claim the July 16 federal deadline is a ruse. Patrick Decorla-Souza at the FHWA confirms that all of the "other applicants either already have statutory
authority, or the granting of authority is not a controversial issue."
The federal grant process is moving forward with our without New York, it seems. 

Azi Paybarah
reports that Sheldon Silver is not calling the State Assembly back to Albany for a vote on Mayor Bloomberg’s congestion pricing proposal. Rather,  he is convening a meeting of New York City and
suburban Assembly members on Monday, July 16 in New York City. If the meeting doesn’t result in some sort of official legislative
approval — and it’s hard to see how it would — New York City’s $500 million will go to Dallas, San Diego, Atlanta, San Francisco, Denver, Miami, Seattle or Minnesota.

Council Member David Yassky, Chair of the Small Business Committee, issued a report on congestion pricing and its effect on small business today. Conclusion:

Suppression
of potential business activity in the area is unlikely. If anything,
the reduction in congestion is expected to cause something of a boost
in productivity, which should have a positive impact on growth in the
area.

Bloomberg’s approval rating is at an all-time high.

The take-away from today’s Times story about the high cost of private parking space in Manhattan: Everyone (including Richard Brodsky and David Weprin) seems to be raking in dough off of parking except the City of New York. Does the Mayor need Albany’s approval to completely revamp New York City’s on-street parking policy? I think not.

Charles Komanoff fixes to get Sheldon Silver’s attention with biblical and Zionist references in this Villager op/ed. Suffice it to say, Shelly’s no Ben-Gurion.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

If Albany Lawmakers Don’t Go Back to Work, NYC Loses

|
Sounding frustrated, Mayor Bloomberg said in his radio address this weekend that it would be "absolutely ridiculous" for state lawmakers to leave hundreds of millions of dollars in federal funds to another city by rejecting New York City’s congestion pricing plan. Opponents of Mayor Bloomberg’s plan, like State Assembly Member Denny Farrell, a Democrat from Northern […]

Glick’s Excuse: Everything But the Kitchen Sink

|
Welcome to Glickville As Deborah Glick herself would tell you, no state legislator had more reason to support congestion pricing than she did. In a district where 95.4 percent of working residents would not have paid the charge, where households with a car are outnumbered by households sans vehicle three to one, and which nonetheless […]

It’s (Apparently) Official: Congestion Pricing Is Dead

|
Following an evening closed-door meeting in which state leaders discussed congestion pricing one last time today, they emerged announcing no deal had been reached. Here is a statement from Mayor Bloomberg: "Today is a sad day for New Yorkers and a sad day for New York City.  Not only won’t we see the realization of […]

Weiner Imagines Paying for His Traffic Plan With a Gas Tax Raise

|
  Though reporters weren’t invited, Streetsblog managed to get a stringer into this morning’s On-and-Off-the-Record transportation policy talk with Congressman Anthony Weiner at Commerce Bank in Midtown. During the hour-long Q&A hosted by Edward Isaac-Dovere of City Hall News, Weiner hit on familiar themes: Something needs to be done about traffic but the mayor’s plan […]

Bloomberg Says There’s No Reason Pricing Shouldn’t Pass

|
Mayor Bloomberg (far, far background) at the Battery Park City Ritz-Carlton this morning It’s now or never for congestion pricing, the MTA, and maybe even the city itself, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said this morning. Speaking before a sold-out crowd at the Battery Park City Ritz-Carlton, Bloomberg and U.S. Transportation Secretary Mary Peters were the guests […]