Panel: Climate Change in NYC: Designing and Building for What’s to Come

According to Columbia University’s Center for Climate Systems Research, the sea level around New York City may rise more than two feet by the year 2080. In addition, "flooding by major storms would inundate many low-lying neighborhoods and shut down the metropolitan transportation system with much greater frequency." Increases in average temperature in the same period are predicted to be between 4 and 10 degrees. The impact on the city’s infrastructure will be profound.

Climate Change in NYC: Designing and Building for What’s to Come

We invite you to hear the experts share their answers.

  • Dr. Radley Horton, climatologist, Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University
  • Michael A. Fishman, Associate Director, Halcrow New York
  • Laurie Kerr, Senior Policy Advisor in the Mayor’s Office of Long Term Planning and Sustainability
  • Dr. Kevin J. Phillips, principal and hydrologist, FPM Group Ltd.
  • Moderator: Michael Gerrard Esq., Partner, Arnold & Porter. Mr. Gerrard is the editor of the book Global Climate Change and U.S. Law, recently published by the American Bar Association, which examines the role of the law in developing mechanisms to protect the climate — in energy conservation, expansion of renewable energy technologies, and implementation of emission caps and trading programs.


New York City 2030. London Today.

On Thursday, as New York City’s highest ranking transportation officials argued before City Council that the city’s increasing traffic congestion and automobile dependence is "an indication of the vitality and the growth of the city of New York," London’s Mayor Ken Livingstone was in Davos, Switzerland announcing that he aims "to make London the world’s […]