Manhattan Institute Panel: Road Pricing Worked in London. Can It Work in New York?

The Center for Rethinking Development at the Manhattan Institute presents . . .

A Panel Discussion and Breakfast:
Road Pricing Worked in London. Can It Work in New York?
What New Yorkers Think

Is New York City choking on its own traffic? Gridlock, pollution, and noise lead many New Yorkers to think so. But every traffic-easing solution involves costs imposed on citizens and businesses‚ and therefore meets steep resistance. Faced with heavy traffic of its own, London initiated a congestion pricing scheme in 2003 that is now widely regarded as successful. Would some variation on road pricing work in New York?

A new report on the feasibility of road pricing in New York, Battling Traffic: What New Yorkers Think, by transportation consultant Bruce Schaller, will be released by the Manhattan Institute. New findings on the economic impact of congestion pricing in London‚ and the implications for New York‚ will be discussed by Partnership President Kathryn Wylde. Congestion-pricing advocate Samuel Schwartz and congestion-pricing opponent David Weprin will offer their analyses of these issues.

Speakers:

Moderator:

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