Two Cops Arrested for Drunken Hit-and-Runs In As Many Days

Do the people sworn to protect us from drunk drivers have a drunk driving problem?

Photo: Franz Golhen
Photo: Franz Golhen

If the NYPD is serious about traffic safety, its rank-and-file haven’t gotten the message.

In the last two days, two off-duty NYPD officers were arrested for fleeing the scene of a collision they caused while under the influence of alcohol.

On Thursday morning, 32-year-old officer Brayan Terrazas was arrested for drunk driving after fleeing the scene of a collision where he had struck and injured a pedestrian.

Terrazas ran a red light on 34th Avenue in Jackson Heights, just before 7 a.m., police sources told the Post. Officers pulled him over about a quarter-mile away. When he got out of the car, “he was swaying while he was walking, had watery eyes and reeked of alcohol,” the Post reported.

The second collision occurred late last night at around 1 a.m. within the confines of the 6th Precinct, which covers the West Village.

The driver, 30-year-old NYPD officer Samantha Medina, strike a 24-year-old pedestrian mid-block on Christopher Street between Hudson Street and Greenwich Avenue.

Medina was arrested and charged with fleeing the scene of a collision involving injuries, driving while intoxicated, and refusing to take a breathalyzer test.

NYPD officers have a long history of dangerous drunken driving, as Streetsblog has documented.

In 2016, off-duty traffic cop Nicholas Batka, 28, hopped the curb at Bedford Avenue and North 8th Street and struck four college students — killing one, 21-year-old Andrew Esquivel.

Batka was fired and charged with assault, manslaughter, homicide, and driving while intoxicated. In the tragedy’s aftermath, then-NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton said NYPD officers were involved in three “drunken-driving episodes” per month, but downplayed the issue.

“That is not a problem in the department,” Bratton said, “but we treat it very seriously.”

It’s unclear if Bratton’s successor, current Commissioner James O’Neill, feels the same way.

Streetsblog has reached out to NYPD for comment.

  • Rex Rocket

    And how many days did Batka spend in prison?

  • Komanoff

    Love the coverage, but the article should have led with the second graf. I mean, we all know the NYPD isn’t serious about street safety (a better term, perhaps, than traffic safety, btw?).

  • MyBrooklyn1

    Cops are criminals in uniforms who commit violations and crimes everyday on duty OFF DUTY only reason these lowlifes don’t have a rap sheet is because they all work for criminal enterprise. Fortunately for them many stupid brainwashed people still believe these criminals in uniforms are heroes….LOL https://twitter.com/MyBrooklyn1

  • Tooscrapps

    Samantha Medina: Exceptional Community Service award winner!

    https://voicesofny.org/2016/07/nypds-new-generation-of-hispanic-officers/

  • Danny G

    How can we encourage & incentivise cops to live in neighborhoods where they don’t feel the need to own a car?

  • lonianncarusso

    These NYPD must stop this drunk driving. They also must be punished for their faults just like we get punished. NYPD IS NO EXCEPTION.

  • lonianncarusso

    You sure got that right! Lol

  • Seriously, you don’t need to editorialize when it’s self-evident, and this is not an audience that needs winning over.

  • neroden

    At least they’re arresting them. The question is, *will the drunk-driving cops lose their jobs, lose their drivers’ licenses, and go to prison*, or will they be let off with a plea deal and continue wandering around drunk with guns and badges.

  • neroden

    Reinstate the legal requirement for cops to live in the jurisdiction they work for. It has a lot of other benefits too — cops who live in the same neighborhood are less likely to abuse their neighbors than “foreign” cops. Require cops to live where they work.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG