Traffic Signals Timed for Bicycling

Here is an interesting bike infrastructure story out of Copenhagen, Denmark. 30,000 Cyclists Get the Green Wave:

Cars and especially buses have for year had the benefit of a green traffic light wave on the roads. But now it is the cyclists turn to enjoy a smooth ride through the city without stopping at red light writes the e-newsletter "News from Copenhagen – Environmental capital of Europe".

Recently the first ‘green wave’ bike route has been inaugurated to the satisfaction of 30,000 cyclists, who use the bike lane on one of Copenhagen’s busiest streets, Nørrebrogade.

"My ambition is to turn Copenhagen into the best bicycle capital in the World. An obvious step is to regulate traffic to the benefit of the Copenhagen cyclists," says Technical and Environmental Mayor of Copenhagen, Klaus Bondam.

The green wave is the first of its kind and traffic light is adjusted to give cyclists a continuous ride if they travel 20 km/h. "It is a rational and sensible speed to pedal, as both children and elderly can keep the pace," says Klaus Bondam.

The green wave stretches over a distance of 2.5 km and it will only take 7½ minutes to travel the distance whereas longer before. The green wave also means that it does not pay off to travel faster as the cyclist eventually will encounter red light.

The green traffic light wave is regulated towards the city between 6.30 and 12.00 and out of the city between 12.00 and 18.00. "At the moment we are looking for new stretches, where green waves are possible solutions to improve conditions on Copenhagen’s many cyclists," says Klaus Bondam. Everyday the Copenhageners cycle 1.2 million kilometres.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Notes on Bicycling in Copenhagen

|
Copenhagen, Denmark is not a natural bicycling city. In the early 1960’s it was very much of a car town. In 1962 the city created its first pedestrian street, the Stroget, and every year since then Copenhagen has allocated more and more of its public space to bicycles, pedestrians and people who just want to sit […]

How to Plan Good Cities for Bicycling

|
Editor’s note: This is the final installment in our series this week featuring Danish architect and livable streets luminary Jan Gehl. The pieces are excerpts are from his book, “Cities for People,” published by Island Press. Donate to Streetsblog and Streetfilms and you’ll qualify to win a copy of the book, courtesy of Island Press. […]

Should I Wear a Helmet Today?

|
The Naparstek boys riding last year’s Summer Streets event… wearing helmets. Sarah’s "Too Much Emphasis on Safety" post yesterday brings up the question in the headline above. A Canadian Broadcasting TV crew doing a documentary on biking is filming me as I take my two sons to school on our Dutch cargo bike today. While […]