Eyes on the Street: No Parking in the Low Post

Photo: Susan Donovan

Streetsblog reader Susan Donovan, a.k.a. Futurebird, posted this pic on Instagram yesterday. It’s a DIY basketball court on Walton Avenue near Joyce Kilmer Park, a few blocks from Yankee Stadium. Writes Donovan:

Creative traffic calming in the Bronx! My neighbors have painted a basketball shooting zone on the street near the bike lane and hydrant creating a basketball court right in the street. (You can see the movable hoop stored nearby.) The city should do this. It’s counter intuitive but street play slows cars and makes everyone safer. What a cool idea.

By taking the play streets concept a step further, this grassroots public space reclamation is reminiscent of a time when kids could play on their blocks with no police barricades needed. Before children “darted” in the streets, they grew up on them.

  • guest

    Street Play may slow traffic – but to what end? Inevitably *a* kid will be playing in these zones and be struck and killed. Street Calming is just a means, not an end to itself.

  • Kevin Love

    Meanwhile, elsewhere on the planet, one of the answers to the question “What are streets for” is “For children playing, of course.” And things like a hopscotch court get officially laid out in colored bricks in the street. See:

    http://www.aviewfromthecyclepath.com/2008/12/what-are-roads-for-part-two.html

  • Kevin Love

    Meanwhile, elsewhere on the planet, one of the answers to the question “What are streets for” is “For children playing, of course.” And things like a hopscotch court get officially laid out in colored bricks in the street. See:

    http://www.aviewfromthecyclepath.com/2008/12/what-are-roads-for-part-two.html

  • Kevin Love

    Meanwhile, elsewhere on the planet, one of the answers to the question “What are streets for” is “For children playing, of course.” And things like a hopscotch court get officially laid out in colored bricks in the street. See:

    http://www.aviewfromthecyclepath.com/2008/12/what-are-roads-for-part-two.html

  • Kids don’t play here alone, I just dont see a car plowing through a basketball game with 5 people and spectators which is how this is used.

    But if we want to be really concerned we could ask that they place a traffic cone I guess.

    The guys who set this up only bring out the hoop when there are adults (and adults play too) so it’s not possible for a kid to just go there and play alone.

  • Brad Aaron

    This makes no sense at all.

  • Joe R.

    Back when my parents where children, even to some extent when I was a child (1960s), it was a lot more common for city kids to play on residential streets. Drivers knew this, and as a result didn’t barrel down these streets. Remember we’re not talking thru streets here. These are streets where the only reason you have to drive on them is if you live on that block or close by.

  • Yes, sort of, but I think I may have mislead you with that blog post.

    In the Netherlands this happens (or happened – it’s a fad from the late 1970s / early 1980s) on streets where there is no through traffic – i.e. no through traffic by bike OR car.

    Dutch woonerven have no straight sections of road, lots of blind corners etc. They are designed to make driving at speed impossible and though the speed limit is set at “walking pace” exceeding it by much of a margin would be difficult.

    This is not a treatment for busy straight through roads with lots of on-road parking, which is what is shown in the video, and they wouldn’t do it with a cycle lane going through as this is all bound to cause conflict.

    The direct cycle-route through the area which is shown in the post you linked to looks completely different to that.

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