Today’s Headlines

  • Cuomo to Seek $30B in Federal Disaster Aid, Including Billions for Roads and Transit (NYT)
  • Times: When It Comes Time to Fund Transit, Remember MTA’s Post-Sandy Performance
  • Thruway Authority Board Postpones Vote on Truck Toll Hike Until Tomorrow (Times Union)
  • Woman, 56, Killed Crossing Victory Boulevard in Staten Island; “No Criminality Suspected” (News)
  • Parking Meter Rates Below 100th Street May Increase to Fill Budget Gap (Post)
  • Gas Rationing Gets Positive Reviews From the Tabloids (News, Post)
  • NYPD Officer Felix Recio Crashes Car in Forest Hills, Charged with DUI (Post)
  • In Battle for Control of State Senate, the Courting of Simcha Felder is Well Underway (Post)
  • MTA Indefinitely Postpones Staten Island Fare Hike Hearing (Advance)
  • Hugh Carey Tunnel Is Back, But PATH Remains in Partial Service (NY1, WSJ)
  • Lhota Apologizes for Calling Bloomberg an “Idiot” for Post-Sandy Transit Remarks (NYT)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • An SI resident

    Here is a more detailed article on the SI pedestrian fatality. http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2012/11/female_pedestrian_struck_and_k.html#incart_river

    She was attempting to cross while the light was green and wearing dark clothes, so this seems like nothing more than an accident.  

  • Anonymous

    How much you want to bet that some of Cuomo’s request for $30B gets diverted to a new Tappan Zee Bridge?

  • @0ea51796bbdfd05b8ae79d94586e47d4:disqus 
    I read the article, and I mostly agree with you. However, seemed to me like the driver who hit the woman was approaching an intersection with a green light, and a car was stopped at the intersection in the left lane, and the approaching vehicle then attempted to swing around the stopped vehicle in the right lane, passing on the right (if not legally questionable, ethically questionable)… and, given the report of the impact, that driver was traveling faster than 30mph both in respect to the ground and the vehicle he/she was passing (bears repeating, from behind on the right)… risks like this are one reason why you don’t drive like that. That’s an incredibly reckless maneuver, even though they had the right-of-way for the laws’ sake and it indeed seems to be an accident primarily caused by the errant pedestrian.

    Overall, it’s just good to know that at least one of our local newspapers cares about the details of an incident when someone is killed (and it’s not a rich young white blonde girl).

  • An SI Resident

    @brianvan:disqus 

    I was three cars back from the accident (I actually wondered at first why the minivan stopped so sort on a green light).  There was no swerving – the driver was going straight ahead.  Victory Blvd. has two travel lines in that area.  Was the driver going over 30, probably.  

    Usually I wouldn’t have posted at all – but as soon as it happened, I knew this blog (which I agree with 95% of the time) would automatically blame the driver and look for charges.  This was just a tragedy of poor decision making all the way around, but no criminality.  

  • Daphna

    To An SI resident:
    There are signs posted on some bikeways that “cyclists must yield to pedestrians at all times”.  This means that even if the bicyclist has the right of way, even if the pedestrian errant, the bicyclist must yield.  The same rule should apply for motorists.  Motorists should have to yield to pedestrians at all times.  Killing someone who’s crossing mid-block or crossing against a light is not acceptable.

    This is a pedestrian-dense city.  Drivers at all times need to be driving with caution and within the speed limit.  Drivers need to be paying attention and be ready to react to any vulnerable road user (such as pedestrian or cyclist or animal).

    This pedestrian likely looked before she crossed.  She likely assessed that she could cross safely.  Pedestrians cross against the light when it is safe to do so.  Rarely do pedestrians just walk into car traffic without first looking.  This suggests that the driver did something unpredictable and unsafe – such as came up at an extreme rate of speed, or was hidden from view behind another vehicle and switched lanes unexpectedly.  Maybe that minivan driver stopped at the green light in order to yield to a pedestrian, the but the other driver was too impatient to do the same.

    Society should not write off the killing of pedestrians as acceptable just because they are out of a crosswalk or against a light.

  • @0ea51796bbdfd05b8ae79d94586e47d4:disqus 

    Of course we’re wary of drivers. I grew up around here as a driver, and I’ve been in collisions where aggressive drivers tried something too tricky and ended up smashing into the side of my car. Not all drivers are nuts, but the nutty ones exist, and our position is that it’s unacceptable.

    My analysis doesn’t fault a driver for changing lanes ahead of the intersection… the way you tell it, the driver still passed a stopped car in the road at above 30mph (both absolute and relative speed) from the right side. That doesn’t affect causality in this situation, but the probability of an accident in that situation is high enough for drivers ed classes everywhere to instruct that one shouldn’t do that.

    I don’t agree with Daphna’s position in the context of this collision, though. Manhattan is pedestrian dense, but a quick look at the map indicates that the spot of the collision is rather suburban, and the details of the story indicate that the pedestrian was unreasonably crossing the road in an unsafe situation against the right-of-way. I must give the driver a bit of a break here and say that there is indeed no criminality. But it should be agreeable that the driver could have been more cautious given the circumstances, if for no other reason than to certify that things like this won’t happen.