CUNY Refuses to Disclose Weinshall Emails About PPW Bike Lane

Earlier this year, Streetsblog filed a set of freedom of information requests in our attempt to reveal the political maneuvering behind the campaign to get rid of the Prospect Park West bike lane. Since then we’ve received voluminous responses from the offices of Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz and City Council Member James Vacca, which have helped fill in some missing details. Thanks to those responses, we now have a clearer sense of how former DOT Commissioner Iris Weinshall, the wife of Senator Chuck Schumer and a resident of Prospect Park West, has played a central role in the bike lane opposition. What we don’t have, for the time being, is any Weinshall correspondence furnished by her current employer, the City University of New York, in response to our freedom of information request.

Prospect Park West resident, former DOT commissioner and current CUNY vice chancellor Iris Weinshall.

CUNY has repeatedly denied access to Weinshall’s email correspondence related to the Prospect Park West bike lane, records which CUNY admits exist but refuses to disclose. CUNY has also withheld PPW-related correspondence from Brooklyn College dean Louise Hainline, who conducted business for the anti-bike lane group “Neighbors for Better Bike Lanes” from her CUNY account.

Information gleaned from other FOIL requests revealed that both Weinshall and Hainline attempted to use CUNY resources to undermine the Prospect Park West project, but CUNY has maintained that the records Streetsblog requested are “personal” in nature and not subject to New York’s freedom of information law.

The only records CUNY has furnished are a handful of emails between Hainline’s husband, Brooklyn College professor Micha Tomkiewicz, and Eric McClure, a co-founder of the neighborhood group Park Slope Neighbors, which organized in support of the PPW redesign before and after implementation. (In the exchange, Tomkiewicz asked McClure for the raw data from a Park Slope Neighbors speed gun survey of Prospect Park West. “The topic of competing transportation interests within a community is a popular research topic of my students,” he wrote. “Reliable data are precious.” McClure shared the speed gun results, but nothing in CUNY’s disclosure indicates that Tomkiewicz did in fact use the data in the classroom.)

CUNY contends that the Weinshall emails they are withholding are exempt from disclosure because they are personal communications “not related to CUNY,” and would cause “economic and personal hardship” to Iris Weinshall and to others who wrote and received them.

Streetsblog is now challenging CUNY’s refusal to disclose the information we requested. Last month we filed a petition in New York County Supreme Court [PDF] seeking the release of the records in our March FOIL requests. The thrust of our petition is that CUNY has claimed an exemption where none exists.

There is no blanket exemption for personal communications under New York’s freedom of information law. New York courts have determined that such correspondence is in fact subject to disclosure except in certain cases where disclosing the information would cause an “unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.” CUNY has not shown that the withheld records meet this criteria.

In fact, emails that we know are being withheld contradict the claim that releasing the correspondence would constitute an unwarranted invasion of privacy. For instance, one of the records CUNY claims it cannot relinquish, which Streetsblog obtained from a separate FOIL request, is a message from bike lane opponent and former deputy mayor Norman Steisel to Iris Weinshall’s CUNY account that was copied to a New York Times reporter [PDF].

To qualify for an exception, CUNY must also show that the emails are not relevant to its work.  Streetsblog contests that claim as well. We already know that Weinshall and Hainline attempted to have City College professor Buzz Paaswell connect them to traffic engineers who could produce a study portraying the PPW redesign in a negative light, and discussed having CUNY students perform such a study. A CUNY administrator and CUNY dean trying to enlist the help of a CUNY professor and CUNY students in their campaign to eradicate a city project — that is, by definition, related to CUNY’s work.

Releasing the emails may embarrass CUNY officials by revealing more about the extent of their work to undermine the Prospect Park West project and NYC DOT’s bike program, but that is not legitimate grounds for withholding the records.

Our case is scheduled to be heard in New York County Supreme Court on July 19. You can review Streetsblog’s petition to the court in this PDF.

  • She looks just like the Church Lady!

    “Now who could it be that’s trying to take away our god-given right to drive fast….
    Could it be …. SATAN?!”

  • Bolwerk

    Not sure what side of the law this falls on, but regardless I find demanding access to academic e-mail accounts to be treading on dangerous ground.

  • Thank you Streetsblog for the reporting, dedication, and amazing scrutiny on PPW and many other stories. While it’s easy to point out the fallacies in tabloid-style coverage by the Marcia Kramer’s of the world, it takes a higher level of journalism to reveal contradictions in politicians’ grandstanding and possible abuses of their offices. I look forward to the result of this FOIL case wherever it may lead, and in the meanwhile hope that all users (on two legs, two wheels, and even behind the windshield) continue enjoying the safety of Prospect Park West’s redesign.
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    cookie jar

  • Joe College

    Dear CUNY:

    An administrator and a dean in your employ have stood behind pseudo-scientific concepts such as the “standard multiplier effect of 50:1 for constituent letters” in order to misrepresent anti-bike-lane sentiment.  On top of requests to use university staffers and students to push a pet project, their affiliated groups have used anecdotal accounts of accidents, rather than official NYPD crash reports and independent analysis, in order to prove that a road design that they are already inclined to think is dangerous is – wait for it – dangerous.

    That Weinshall and Hainline’s so-called research would earn the average student an F should be the biggest embarrassment to what is otherwise an excellent university system.

    Is this kind of behavior representative of CUNY as a whole?

  • J. Assange

    The suit is only seeking emails related to the bike lane.  It’s not a fishing expedition, nor is it some sort of Ward-Churchill-like witch hunt.  If Streetsblog found some embarrassing but unrelated information in any email, I have confidence in the reporting and ethics of the editors and reporters here that such information would not be made available for public consumption.

  • Eliot

    I somewhat agree.  That is, I think academic freedom is sacrosanct and worth protecting.  And there have been clear cases where FOIL requests were used to stifle academic inquiry.  However, I think there’s an important difference in this case. 

    Weinshall and Hainline weren’t pursuing any form of academic inquiry — they were attempting to leverage their positions and use public resources to influence city policy.  Further, they were using their official (public-funded) positions to persuade other CUNY personnel to provide free services for NBBL — a personal project that has nothing whatsoever to do with CUNY’s mission. 

    If they used CUNY’s photocopiers to make free fliers for NBBL, that wouldn’t be academic freedom — it would be an abuse of public resources. 

  • Eliot

    I somewhat agree.  That is, I think academic freedom is sacrosanct and worth protecting.  And there have been clear cases where FOIL requests were used to stifle academic inquiry.  However, I think there’s an important difference in this case. 

    Weinshall and Hainline weren’t pursuing any form of academic inquiry — they were attempting to leverage their positions and use public resources to influence city policy.  Further, they were using their official (public-funded) positions to persuade other CUNY personnel to provide free services for NBBL — a personal project that has nothing whatsoever to do with CUNY’s mission. 

    If they used CUNY’s photocopiers to make free fliers for NBBL, that wouldn’t be academic freedom — it would be an abuse of public resources. 

  • Eliot

    I somewhat agree.  That is, I think academic freedom is sacrosanct and worth protecting.  And there have been clear cases where FOIL requests were used to stifle academic inquiry.  However, I think there’s an important difference in this case. 

    Weinshall and Hainline weren’t pursuing any form of academic inquiry — they were attempting to leverage their positions and use public resources to influence city policy.  Further, they were using their official (public-funded) positions to persuade other CUNY personnel to provide free services for NBBL — a personal project that has nothing whatsoever to do with CUNY’s mission. 

    If they used CUNY’s photocopiers to make free fliers for NBBL, that wouldn’t be academic freedom — it would be an abuse of public resources. 

  • Mike

    Weinshall is NOT an academic.  She is an administrator responsible for facilities planning and construction.

  • Mike

    Weinshall is NOT an academic.  She is an administrator responsible for facilities planning and construction.

  • Mike

    Weinshall is NOT an academic.  She is an administrator responsible for facilities planning and construction.

  • If I thought there was any chance that this FOIL action would stifle academic inquiry, Streetsblog would not have filed these requests. The scope of the request is narrow and will not turn up material related to academic research.

  • @Miles – Now, now, let’s not focus on looks. Though if you put William Shatner in some cat’s-eye glasses and had him stand in a green bike lane yelling “Khaaaaan!” (as in, Janette Sadik-), he’d be a dead ringer.

  • Ben-

    Will not turn up material related to academic research EXCEPT to the extent these three CUNY officials are using “academic research” as a beard to hide their NBBL activities.  But none of them appear to have done or be doing any bona fide academic research concerning bike lanes or Prospect Park West.

  • Wait a minute…I’m confused.  Louise Hainline’s NBBL lawyer Jim Dunn says that FOIL has to be given its broadest scope, and he’s not happy with city agencies holding back documents on NBBL’s FOIL requests, but her CUNY lawyer says they’re not giving up anything?

  • krstrois

    Amazing work, Ben et al. Thank you all so much for this effort. I can’t tell you how much my family and I really appreciate it. It may seem a narrow thing to people who are not following it closely, but this kind of behavior, on the part of politically connected people, is what kills livable streets initiatives going forward. This is why I follow this closely, though I am not in the neighborhood.
    I can only guess how deeply embarrassing it will be for CUNY to have evidence out there that demonstrates how its upper reaches tried to manipulate a public process ex post facto, and using their students, no less. I have no idea about legality or illegality, but it’s exceptionally tacky to see powerful people circumvent a democratic process and it’s going to look extremely bad for them. 

  • Park Slope Neighbor

    Great work!

    N.B. the FOIL .pdf file is missing page 24.  Can it be added back?

  • Streetsman

    If I’m CUNY, that’s the question I’d be asking – why would our Vice Chancellor of Facilities and one of our deans at Brooklyn College vehemently oppose a statistically-proven safety facility for family recreation, requested by the local community board, and stoop so low as to sue the City for its removal? What a disgusting and totally transparent tactic, not to mention a complete rejection of the community process and a reflecting a rather troubling unwillingness to accept empirical data. It is unbecoming of people in their position – they set a bad example for their institution and certainly do not embody CUNY’s ideals of “civic inspiration, responsiveness to public needs”, nor “teaching, research and public service.” The actions they’ve taken symbolize aristocratism, dogmatism, manipulation, and vindictiveness. Why would anyone work with these people? Probably out of fear that if you disagree with them, they and their cronies will sue you and then call on the local newspapers to run attack stories for the next four months.

  • Sasha

    I’m sorry to ask a question that undoubtedly 99% of the people here already know the answer to, but I don’t quite understand why the petitioners are against the PPW bike lane with such vitriol. I know that we live in a largely anti-bike climate, but I’ve never known of such opposition in other parts of the city with new bike lanes.  What, if anything, makes the PPW lane so contested?  Any answers would be appreciated — I don’t live in Bk, and I’m a new biker, so it’s been hard to catch up on the real pith of this particular issue.  Thanks!

  • Sasha

    I’m sorry to ask a question that undoubtedly 99% of the people here already know the answer to, but I don’t quite understand why the petitioners are against the PPW bike lane with such vitriol. I know that we live in a largely anti-bike climate, but I’ve never known of such opposition in other parts of the city with new bike lanes.  What, if anything, makes the PPW lane so contested?  Any answers would be appreciated — I don’t live in Bk, and I’m a new biker, so it’s been hard to catch up on the real pith of this particular issue.  Thanks!

  • Anonymous

    Excellent question. Claimed concerns about safety don’t hold up to scrutiny and fears of traffic problems have been dispelled. I have come to believe their opposition is largely aesthetic. They believe the bike lane has somehow destroyed “their” majestic boulevard. Needless to say, some of us who actually walk and bike on PPW rather than just driving on it and looking out of windows at it have a different perspective.

  • Brooklynite

    Iris Weinshall is not an academic. She’s an administrator and a $235,000/year city employee. If she and other CUNY employees are using CUNY resources to run a political attack campaign against her successor at NYC DOT, that has nothing to do with “academic email accounts” or academic freedom. This is something we ought to know about.

    Likewise, I wish folks you were equally as concerned with the extreme chill that NBBL attorney Jim Walden’s fishing expedition into Brad Lander and DOT email accounts has cast over activists and advocates who wish to engage with city officials and electeds.

    I’m glad Streetsblog is on top of this story because, lord knows, the New York Times has always been too terrified to touch Mrs. Schumer.

  • IvoryJive

    IMO I think this is exactly what Freedom of Information Law is about. These are public officials in taxpayer-funded positions using their city email accounts to discuss and possibly influence a city project affecting the citizens of New York. As a voter and taxpayer, I want to know what they are saying and to who, regardless of whether it is related to their work at CUNY or not. Based on this information, I will voice my opinions about it to the relevant agencies and elected officials. I don’t necessarily take issue with Hainline or Weinshall using city email for personal business (without knowing what they were up to), but do I want the relevant Community Board, councilmember, Borough President, mayor, and possibly US Senator to know the extent to which the influence of these city employees has impacted this project. If this were to confirm my suspicions that they are involved with planting Marcia Kramer stories and lobbying transpo chairman Vacca, then I damn well believe we all have a right to know that. My tax money pays the salaries of all those people (except Marcia Kramer), plus the salaries of DOT staffers who have wasted all this time defending this community-requested project from them, and the city Law Department that has to deal with this stupid lawsuit, and I am really annoyed about it all.

  • Anonymous

    I think different opponents have different reasons for their discontent, some aesthetic, some cultural; for some the inability to look both ways.  For the core NBBL organizers, though–the people behind the lawsuit–this has to be some combination of personal vendettas and a Maginot Line for a certain clique within the elite political class of NYC who are accustomed to having their demands met without question.  Their inability to have the bike lane project killed or removed by pulling the normal levers of power has exposed their weakness, and to capitulate now would only prove their impotence.  Personally I think it would be better to walk away and maintain the illusion of influence rather than double down and be publicly defeated, but that’s just me.  They are either delusional, or fully confident that the system is sufficiently rigged in their favor.  I’m not a plutocrat, so I don’t really know how grabbing and holding onto power works, but this is certainly an interesting and somewhat operatic drama.

  • Anonymous

    Agreed.  Based on their resistance, the likelihood of some significant revelations seems high, right?

  • Eric McClure

    Mr. Tomkiewicz also suggested in an email to me that “having some of the students trying to chat with you – might be very productive.”  Oddly, I’m still waiting for that invitation to chat with his “students.”

    He also forgot to mention that he lived at ground zero for the PPW bike path opposition in any of our correspondence — though we had pledged publicly that we would share our speed data with anyone who asked for it.

  • Concerned Park Slope Resident

    There are substantial revelations in the Streetsblog petition regarding Weinshall and Hainline’s use of CUNY resources to do political organizing and lobbying. You’ve got to wonder what else will turn up. Given what we see in the petition, I suspect Streetsblog’s FOIL request is being denied because Weinshall has to be concerned about keeping her job.

  • Park Slope Parent

    If you’re curious what Brooklyn College president Karen Gould thinks of Louise Hainline’s on-the-job activities and refusal to comply with a reasonable FOIL request you can ask her yourself.

    bcpresident@brooklyn.cuny.edu
    718.951.567

  • Park Slope Parent

    718.951.5671

  • Updated the PDF. The missing page is there now.

  • DNK

    Well, at least Dean Hainline fully acknowledges in her own email to other NBBL members that she is misusing CUNY resources and conducting herself inappropriately:

    “Now to do the work I didn’t get done today because of the above…”

  • Anonymous

    Iris Weinshall should be disciplined by CUNY for using city resources for her personal business.  I’m pretty sure that’s not permitted.

  • DNK

    CUNY’s policy on that is clear on that. See page 17 of the legal brief. Just from what we see in this legal document, there doesn’t seem to be any question that Weinshall and Hainilne violated CUNY policy and, at the very least, need to be disciplined. Or, as their own attorney Jim Walden demanded of DOT staffers: They should be placed on “administrative leave.”

  • krstrois

    Finally read through the entire brief (really well-written and clear, btw) and I hesitate to be dramatic as I do not know the law nor much about CUNY, but it seems like Weinshall and Hainline could lose their jobs over this. 

  • Johnny Pulitzer

    Holy scandal, Michael Grynbaum! THIS is the story you ought to be telling: how a scorned former DOT chief and an obsessed Brooklyn College dean abused their positions at CUNY to wage a political campaign against green paint on “their” street. 

    There’s the senator’s wife, the dean and the professor, all on taxpayer-funded salaries using taxpayer-funded offices to bring down a project that’s overwhelmingly popular with taxpayers.  There’s a colorful — if not vaguely threatening — email from a former deputy mayor.  You have multiple phone calls to Jimmy Vacca that make stalkers look tame and a refusal to cooperate with a FOIL request that makes Marty Markowitz look reasonable in comparison.  You’ve got Louise Hainline admitting she’s not spending enough time on her real work, you know, the stuff she’s getting paid to do.  You have a deceptive — and ultimately dumb — ploy by a professor to get data from a neighborhood activist…when the data would have been given freely anyway!

    Thank you, Streetsblog for doing real investigative journalism AND telling a compelling story.  NYC’s mainstream media could generate a few page views if they published stuff like this.

  • ASDF

    Yeah, but Johnny, to get this story Michael Grynbaum would have had to FOIL a bunch of documents, do a bunch of reporting and really stick with it for a few months. In the process he’d have angered a lot of wealthy and powerful people and that’s often not great for your career.

    Grynbaum would much prefer to generate stories based on NBBL press releases from Linda Gross or whatever Jim Walden and Norman Steisel happen to be whispering into his ear. It’s much less work and — bonus! — the story Jim and Norman are telling fits much more neatly with the narrative that Grynbaum’s editors want to present in this unholy third term of Bloomberg and his bike-riding transportation czarina.

  • Janie Pulitzer

    Uh, except there’s probably a BMW-driving cabbie or a ride in Emo Phillips’ candy-red ’57 Chevy or some other compelling “transportation beat” story that takes precedence.

  • Johnny Pulitzer

    True, ASDF. It’s also much easier for Grynbaum to “investigate” Fran Lebowitz and her Checker Cab.

  • Anonymous

    YES!!!   Her face has bugged me for so long, and I couldnt figure out why!  And dragging a good guy transport professional like Buzz Paaswell into this is really the height of poor taste.  I hope this is seen through to its conclusion with a total humilation of the NIMBYs plus a reroute of the B41 via PPW on a curbside bus lane!!

  • guest

    Hey mr glass house, tell me you never wrote a personal email from your job because I aint buyin it

  • Sloper

    I was just on the bike lane yesterday- its a confusing mess for the walkers, the strollers, the bladers, skateboarders and the bikers alike and its very hard to took every way for everything that might be passing your way. Its confusing because there arent any streets that have this particular kind of pattern and no one seems to know what to do so its not ‘safer’ for anyone. The green paint is ugly and the parked cars in the middle of the whole mess all make a very pretty street look pretty gross. I don’t care where you live, a street like that deserves majesty given some of the most beautiful houses in the city are the backdrop. Heaven forbid someone has to drop someone or something off in front of their house/apt- the street gets backed up for blocks over it. Its not a pretty sight and its a stupid plan and a failure for everyone’s purpose- no one wins

  • Anonymous

    ” I suspect Streetsblog’s FOIL request is being denied because Weinshall has to be concerned about keeping her job.”

    Um, I think her hubby may also like to keep her out of the news.

  • Anonymous

    …and constant, nonsensical, hand-wringing little diatribes like the one below are what we have to put up with.  Some people can’t get used to something new, or hate young people and families, or something, but rather than just say what their problem is, they prefer to claim they literally aren’t bright enough to figure out how to walk or double park anymore.  Or that 3 lanes of speeding traffic=majesty, and are more aesthetically appealing than two lanes of traffic not speeding as much.  It’s a wonder these helpless people have survived the mean streets of NYC for this long, only to be completely vexed by a 2 way bike lane that “no one uses.” Actually, everyone wins, even the people who don’t like it, for the simple fact that speeding has been reduced. 

    Guest: Tell your manservant to use your freaking driveway if you need him to drop something off.  I’m sure if you’re smart enough to use the internets, you are smart enough to learn to look both ways when you cross the bike lane, just like you would crossing 5th Ave, 6th Ave, 7th Ave, Flatbush, Union, or, really, any other two way street you might have noticed in the past.  They’re everywhere.
    *sorry for feeding the troll sometimes I can’t help myself.*

  • Kaja

    So wait — Weinshall makes $235K of public trough at City College, following her post at DOT… I see’s worked inside government-funded offices her entire life. Masters’ in Public Service!
    Public’s been serving her pretty well!

    One word for this woman: Leech.

  • dporpentine

    @Guest: “a street like that deserves majesty given some of the most beautiful houses in the city are the backdrop.”

    Where “majesty” = an unused speedway

    Where “some of the most beautiful houses in the city” = a mix of brownstones and apartment buildings no different from thousands of others all over the city

    Where “a street like that” = a street much like many others all over the city and even on other sides of that same blinking park (“I know that, I mean, obviously  I know that. It’s just that those other sides, um, you know, some of them, um, the people that live there, um, a majority of the population . . . uh, culture . . . consists of . . . you know, gentlemen of color [is that what you’re supposed to call them nowadays?] and, um, gentlewomen of dark too . . . and, um, I mean, obviously, I’m not racist, I’m just saying that our street is, um, demographically significant–I mean, *architecturally* significant, sorry!”)

    Bonus bit of idiocy: “Heaven forbid someone has to drop someone or something off in front of
    their house/apt- the street gets backed up for blocks over it” = “Waahhhh! I want to double park and not feel the same consequences of it that all the little people do.”

    It’s the mix of transparent nonsense plus squealing, unselfconscious privilege that makes the Neighbors for Open Autocracy bunch so maddening. I suppose the pseudo-high-mindedness (“Don’t those meany bikers know that old people can’t look left and right!”) doesn’t hurt either.

    I’m also sorry for the troll feeding. But “Guest” is such a perfect Louise Hainline stand-in that it’s hard to stop yourself.

  • I guess the “spectre” of Park Slope Neighbors behaving in a fair and transparent way was too much for poor Louise and Micha.  It must have been way more fun to cast you as a nefarious enemy and ensnare you in a web of deceit that to simply ask for the data!

  • New York Post

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/school_for_scandal_gpcWo9rJss0Ko3H0yk75VL

    SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL
    $afety Net at CUNY for Fallen City Bigs

    By ANNIE KARNI and CYNTHIA R. FAGEN

    Last Updated:
    6:45 AM, March 28, 2010

    Whether you left city government with good references or under
    investigation, chances are a cushy academic position awaits you at the
    City University of New York.
    Four former commissioners in Mayor
    Bloomberg’s administration — two of whom who resigned amid scandals —
    currently hold teaching and administrative posts at CUNY, funded by
    taxpayer dollars.

    Former Finance Commissioner Martha Stark —
    forced out the door in disgrace last April after she was outed for
    dating a subordinate and hiring relatives — currently holds a
    “distinguished lecturer” position at Baruch College. She collects an
    annual salary of $103,285.

    The city’s former commissioner of
    correction and probation, Martin Horn, stepped down in June. Under his
    watch, three guards and a dozen inmates were indicted on charges of
    beating to death an 18-year-old Rikers Island inmate. In June, red-faced
    Correction Department brass were caught allowing an inmate to hold a
    jailhouse bar mitzvah for his son in the lower-Manhattan jail.

    Horn is now a distinguished lecturer at John Jay School of Criminal Justice, where he earns $107,142 a year.

    Bloomberg’s taxi and limousine commissioner, Matthew Daus, announced
    his resignation Feb. 13 — just weeks before he said he was told of an
    $8.3 million taxi-meter-tampering fraud, in which thousands of cabbies
    overcharged unsuspecting riders

    In addition to pursuing
    private-sector business ventures, he will become a distinguished
    lecturer at CUNY’s Transportation Research Center. A spokesman for the
    Taxi and Limousine Commission said the salary has not yet been
    determined.

    Members of the Bloomberg administration lobbied
    CUNY on his behalf, City Hall sources said. Daus also has longtime ties
    to CUNY.

    Meanwhile, Bloomberg’s former transportation
    commissioner, Iris Weinshall, rakes in $233,730 a year as vice
    chancellor for facilities, planning, construction and management at
    CUNY.

    As commissioner, federal probers singled her out for poor
    oversight in management that led to the 2003 Staten Island Ferry crash
    that killed 11 people. Weinshall, who is married to Sen. Charles
    Schumer, remained in office, resigning five years later to take the
    higher-paying post.

  • J.F.

    @ae3726d1e3d45e351c13b39598653ee4:disqus

    I imagine one big difference between @cc36704b289cbef0ac72a06121c6c6d8:disqus and Weinshall / Hainline is that krstrois doesn’t have an attorney going to every media outlet in town making bogus accusations of wrong-doing and demanding that NYC DOT staff be placed on “administrative leave.”

    The ones living in glass houses here are the NBBL folks. They wanted FOILs and media attention and Article 78 law suits… Well, they got ’em.

  • Joe R.

    Thanks, dporpentine for more or less saying what I intended to say.  What it comes do to for all the complainers is basically “I can’t double park.  Waaahhh!”  And the whole asthethic argument is silly.  Anyone so concerned with “preserving the historical character” of that street should advocate for getting rid of the ugly rows of parked cars (an eyesore if there ever was one), and returning the streetcar lines.

  • BTW…This article is now #4 result when “Weinshall” is searched on Google…

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For Nearly Two Years, Ex-NYC DOT Chief Has Undercut the Signature Street Safety and Sustainable Transportation Agenda of Her Successor

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Tomorrow, Brooklyn Supreme Court Judge Bert Bunyan is expected to weigh in for the first time on the core arguments brought by opponents of the Prospect Park West redesign against the City of New York. Ostensibly, the dispute is between the anti-bike lane groups known as “Neighbors for Better Bike Lanes” (NBBL) and “Seniors for […]

The NBBL Files: Chuck Schumer “Doesn’t Like the Bike Lane”

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Editor’s note: With yesterday’s appellate ruling prolonging the Prospect Park West case, Streetsblog is running a refresher on the how the well-connected gang of bike lane opponents waged their assault against a popular and effective street safety project. This is the third installment from the six-part NBBL Files. This piece originally ran on October 5, 2011. This is […]

Vacca Watch: Pre-Bike Hearing Chatter Between Transpo Chair Staffer, NBBL

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City Council Transportation Committee chair James Vacca has made headlines for his inquisitorial hearings on DOT’s bike and plaza programs. And it looks like his office was batting around ideas with street safety opponents before the first of those hearings last December. Email correspondence obtained by Streetsblog from Marty Markowitz’s office indicates that a Vacca […]