Today’s Headlines

  • da

    The 3rd Street entrance to Prospect Park is permanently closed to vehicles as of today!!!

  • Larry Littlefield

    “In New York, about 4 percent of all the MTA operating costs are covered by the state budget; in other states, transit agencies are getting closer to 6 percent.”

    There is another side to the story.

    While NY transit riders pay more for a higher share of their transit than average in fares, NY taxpayers and tollpayers also pay more for transit than average in taxes, as a share of their income.

    The reason? The large amount of transit there is here.

    Imagine the transit system were cut in half, which would still be more transit that other places get. Suddenly that 4 percent paid for by the state could rise to 8 percent without the state paying an extra dime.

    And if we were a typical metro area with little transit, it could be free and still require very little in taxes, because the total cost of transit would below relative to metro area income.

    Looking at the reverse case, in which everyone used transit, how could non-transit users pay for the transit system? The closer one gets to 100% transit and 0% non-transit, the more shifting costs to non-transit users becomes onerous.

    Bottom line: in FY 2006, mass transit spending in NYC equaled $20.03 for every $1,000 earned by everyone in the city, compared with $4.07 per $1,000 natinonally. So everyone needs to pay, whether in tax or toll and fare, more here than elsewhere.

    Or else it goes down, and the NY state economy goes down with it, as Manhattan accounts for 53% of the private earnings in all of New York State, if the substantially goverment-funded health care and social assistance sector is excluded — perhaps three-quarters of the NY State economy if multiplier effects are included.

  • J. Mork

    “The mayor is entitled to his opinion,” Smith said. “This is a time for shared sacrifice and shared
    support.”

    What a cynical jerk.

  • Geck

    Yes, 3rd Street entrance is closed. Signs went up today. The PPW bike lane can’t come soon enough. Police have been out on a few occasions recently ticketing cyclists for riding on the sidewalk, etc. (Let’s hold off on a big debate about that-and simple acknowledge the need for a separate space for bicyclists on PPW).

  • Glenn

    If Smith’s plan comes up for a vote, I hope I see Manhattan Senators vote against it (I’m looking at you especially Liz Krueger!)

    Once that gets rejected, I hope they can go back and work something around the Ravitch/Silver plans.

  • “So everyone needs to pay, whether in tax or toll and fare, more here than elsewhere.”

    One would hope that’s accompanied by a correspondingly lesser proportion we have to pay for roads and bridges.

  • senate bill?

    Is the latest senate MTA bill online anywhere? Didnt see it on the leg website. Post a link if you have one.

  • “This is a time for shared sacrifice and shared support.”

    Shared sacrifice except for car commuters, that is. Cynical jerk is right.

  • Larry Littlefield

    “One would hope that’s accompanied by a correspondingly lesser proportion we have to pay for roads and bridges.”

    We don’t seem to save a lot of public employees there, but we do seem to have fewer private employees working on infrastructure.

    Local government highways employees per 100,000 residents in 2007: U.S. 100 NYC 80 Downstate suburbs 131. Census Bureau.

    Private heavy construction industry employment that year (includes all types of non-building construction including infrastructure) per 100,000 residents U.S. 334 NYC 94 Downstate suburbs 192. BLS.

    We certainly do save a lot on private autos according to the Consumer Expenditures Survey, however, even though the private autos we do have are more expensive (especially insurance). Employment data provides an indicator.

    Private employment in auto-related industries (sales, service, parking) in 2007 per 100,000 residents: U.S. 1,431, NYC 481, Downstate suburbs 1,136.

  • Mike