Want Separated Lanes on Chrystie Street? Tonight’s Your Night.

Since our post from last week on tonight’s Community Board 3 meeting, where DOT will be presenting its plan for bike lanes on Chrystie Street, several Streetsbloggers have wondered why a physically separated corridor is not being considered for this heavily-traveled route.

Writes Mark:

This is a big missed opportunity. If there was ever a perfect place for a cycle track, northbound on Chrystie Street is it. Between Canal and Houston, only Grand and Delancey cut through east west making it almost like a greenway. We need good cycling infrastructure around the bridges because they are areas of high demand. It doesn’t need to be anything fancy, just something simple and attractive to keep out double-parked vehicles and car doors. Let’s get in a temporary trial cycle track in the next few months, and if it works make it forever.

I am grateful for the new DOT, but think sometimes their plans fall short in the details… A bike lane on Chrystie street is good, but why not design it right? The better these improvements look and work, the more they will be loved by the public.

If you think Chrystie Street would be a good spot for Class 1 facilities, tonight will be the time to ask questions and make your voice heard. Sign-in for the meeting begins at 6:00 at P.S. 20, 166 Essex Street (E. Houston and Stanton Sts.).

  • Jacob

    If you want concrete North American examples of successful inexpensive cycle tracks, look no further than Montreal. Rue Rachel E has a two-way cycle track on a one-way street. They simply moved the parking lane out ten feet and striped a 2-way bicycle lane. The issues that AASHTO has with conflicts at intersection are accommodated by removing one parking space on each side of intersections (daylighting). There were no additional phases installed at intersection. No complicated extra bike signals. No new curbs. The cost is very minimal (paint mainly), and the effects are incredible. The Christie Street plan already call for a large removal of parking spaces. Why not use that parking instead to protect cyclists?

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