Pedestrian Safety Competition at the Jersey Shore

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Pedestrian Plaza in Stone Harbor, New Jersey

Towns along the New Jersey shore are in constant competition to attract visitors from New York, Philadelphia and all around the region. The same is true of major cities, residential neighborhoods and shopping districts but over a longer cycle. Since the beaches are relatively similar in most areas, they mostly compete on how "pleasant" the area is to people, offering conveniences and neighborhood amenities that differentiate them from the rest. Creating a high quality Pedestrian and Bike friendly enviroment is one way that many are competing for tourists dollars.

Stone Harbor, NJ is one shore town that has done quite of bit of work in making their town safe for pedestrians and disabled folks by creating pleasant places to relax, shop and even do good by the environment. Avalon, NJ has also done some of these, but with more of an emphasis on cycling amenities. Here is a little photo tour of some interesting pieces of urban planning straight from the Jersey Shore.

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Convenient Recycling Station in Pedestrian Plaza

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Pedestrian Crossing Sign Near Busy Intersection

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Midblock Crossing From One Pedestrian Plaza to Another

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Public Benches Every Few Blocks to Take a Rest

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More Public Benches Near Shops

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Prime Reserved Street Parking for Disabled Folks

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Safety Ramps at Curb Cuts

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In Nearby Avalon, NJ there is More Provision for Cyclists

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Clear Signs About Sidewalk Use

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And Some Gentle Safety Reminders

  • Part of me sees that and thinks, “where are all the tall buildings? New York can never be like that. Not all places can be like New York, not all places can be like these little towns on the Jersey Shore, etc.”

    But the reality is that all of these places need to start adopting some of the better aspects of each other in order to enhance walking, cycling & public transport and discourage driving. Whatever of these ideas can be adopted should, and we need to have a willingness to experiment, too.

    Thanks for the photos, may they spring a hundred new ideas for New York City.

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