Friday’s Headlines: You Deserve a Weekend Off Edition

You're sleepy.
You're sleepy.

New York, what a week. Let’s not belabor the point: You’re worn out — from the slow pace of COVID vaccinations to the excitement down in Georgia to the horrifying excitement down in D.C. and back to the slow pace of COVID vaccinations. Take the weekend off.

But first, here’s the news from yesterday that you might have missed:

  • The Post added a few more details to what we had about the first cyclist death of the year.
  • A water main break cut off car access to the Cross Bronx Expressway yesterday, prompting breathless coverage in the New York Times and other outlets. Meanwhile, the Parks Department has cut off the continent’s busiest bike path for what was supposed to be two weeks of repairs that are now stretching into their third month, yet no one but Streetsblog is covering it. The Parks Department won’t give us a completion date.
  • The Times profiled Taylor Mali, who is obsessed (rightly!) with getting plastic bags out of trees.
  • There was so little news yesterday that amNY made a story about a tiny sinkhole that closed one block of a street in the East Village.
  • Patch played both-siderism on the very limited opposition to the protected bike lanes on the Upper East Side.  We gave you the real story, with hat tips to Council candidate Billy Freeland, Liam Jeffries and Devin Gould.

And that’s all! See you Monday.

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